• Brian Chilson
  • Issue Archive for
  • Jun 20-26, 2012
  • Vol. 38, No. 42
Digital Edition

News

  • Times tats

    To coincide with the Arkansas Arts Center's upcoming exhibit "Tattoo Witness: Photographs by Mark Perrott," the Arkansas Times decided to highlight photos of the tattoos (and the stories that go along with them) of some of the office staff.
  • Glenwood teen 'stuck' in Mexico

    President Obama's order this week that would stop the deportation of illegal immigrants who came to the United States before the age of 16 and are high school graduates and meet other conditions will not help Kaiti Tidwell of Glenwood, who returned to Mexico in May to get the necessary papers she needs to immigrate legally, she tells the Times.
  • Flower power

    There used to be a huge mural of a flower on the side of a building near the corner of Main Street and Third in downtown Little Rock: a vast, lush bloom of some sort (we've heard it called a rose, but it looked to us like something else, maybe a camellia), easily two stories high and done up in Miami pastels, the flower sprouting from a ring big enough to be God's hula hoop.
  • Identifying with McMath, Osborne

    Ernie Dumas' story about Sid McMath ("Sid McMath: An Arkansan for All Seasons," special supplement, June 13) was most fascinating and informative. I read the article to the last word. Ernie is a consummate writer, and I always enjoy his tomes.

Columns

  • Tea-partying GOP puts coal before kids

    If the constant warfare over government regulation of business bores or confuses you, this week's news furnishes a perfect primer. The campaign to stop the government from reducing the mercury and arsenic that coal-fired generating plants belch into the air and streams illustrates better than anything what the regulation battle is all about and what it means for the average American.
  • Seasonal madness

    We are coming upon mad cow season, when stricken bovines, sometimes masked, set upon terrified wilderness hikers of the human variety, most commonly in the Ouachita Mountains of western Arkansas.
  • For good and forbade

    "Her mother told her it was 'prideful' to watch herself on screen, so she didn't. Later, orphaned, she lived with 'nutso' relatives who forbid watching movies."
  • Romney bets on suckers

    A citizen would have to be awfully naive to expect strict fidelity to the truth from any politician, much less a presidential candidate. As a thought experiment, however, it's interesting to wonder how an epic prevaricator like Mitt Romney would handle the presidency.

Entertainment

  • 'A Loss of Roses' a stunner

    Before last Friday night, the saddest, most "depressing" Depression-era story I had read was Horace McCoy's "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" However, after watching The Arkansas Repertory Theatre's opening performance of William Inge's "A Loss of Roses," I can attest that this play is as rough and unflinching as that Depression-era tale, or any other.

Dining

  • Two high fives plus one

    On most Sundays, Crystal Bridges' Eleven is slammed around midday. And why not? The food is delicious and reasonably priced, the space is breezy and inviting, and you're seated in the shadow of Claes Oldenburg's 1975 "Alphabet/Good Humor" — three feet of pink cartoon letter/intestines, mounted on a popsicle stick.

Cartoons


 

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