Anne Bonney, Pirate 
Member since Mar 30, 2011

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This citizen of the Free State of Hillcrest is a radiant speck of blue in that vast crimson sea of crimson known as "Arkansas." She… More »

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Re: “Anybody home?

It seems that the North Carolina military, wearing last year's fatigues, has invaded Clarksdale as part of the Jade Helm 15 project. I shit you not.

Despite being out of fashion the camo apparently still works well, seeing as how North Carolina's invasion of western Arkansas went completely unnoticed by the entire state of Tennessee and the eastern reaches of Arkansas herself. This public post by Gene McVay, Baxter County's self-styled "Conservative Christian Author" (I guess he's referring to his blog) who made an unsuccessful run against that notorious liberal Mike Huckabee in 1998, parses the facts and includes a photo in this Facebook post that has been shared over 160 times, like a modern-day Paul Revere's Ride for only the most discerning paranoid tea-partiers: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10…

It's a fascinating read. You're welcome.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 05/03/2015 at 11:34 PM

Re: “City attorney says LR civil rights ordinance doesn't conflict with state law

That letter is a work of logic, reason, and sublime beauty.

10/10 would read again...and again.

28 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 04/19/2015 at 9:42 PM

Re: “Presbyterian ministers speak out against anti-gay HB 1228

I'll also add that a Methodist minister, Rev. Dr. Candace Barron, testified against the 10 Commandments bill. Not all religious people are crazy - just enough of them around here that we end up with horrific legislators and horrific religion-based laws.

9 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 03/30/2015 at 9:43 AM

Re: “Apple CEO calls HB 1228 'dangerous' in op-ed

Silverback, Arkansans for Equality is offering just such a sticker. Contact them at http://www.arkansansforequality.org.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 03/29/2015 at 11:01 PM

Re: “Ten Commandments monument bill clears House committee

I really wanted to school the Committee on the history of American jurisprudence, but I may have gotten too detailed for them. They cut me off when I got into how the common law came to be. (We all know that the Code of Wessex and the Mercian Code didn't really exist, right? You know, because Jesus.)

7 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 03/27/2015 at 12:52 PM

Re: “Ten Commandments monument bill clears House committee

The first four commandments are all about worshipping the Abrahamic god, something that was expressly removed from government by the First Amendment. And that thing about graven images? I think about it every time I pass another nativity scene on government property. It's certainly not part of American law.

Anyone who has ever been a victim of parental abuse or neglect has pretty good grounds for ignoring the fifth commandment, which is not encoded anywhere in our laws - common law or statutory.

Homicide is outlawed by every culture, regardless of its religious roots. The Ten Commandments did not initiate the "don't kill" idea.

There is no law against adultery. The Arkansas legislature even did away with the civil penalties for it when, in the 1970's, it repealed a cause of action for "alienation of affection."

"Don't steal" is another one of those rules that every single society observes regardless of religious roots. It is necessary for living in a harmonious society. Moses wasn't the first person to present this idea of not taking other people's stuff.

Perjury is indeed a part of our law, but once again, it did not originate with Moses. Not lying about important things is another one of those rules of harmonious societies.

As for the last two commandments - we live in a capitalist society. Capitalism is built upon coveting what we don't have and purchasing it. If these two commandments were enforced, it would spell the end of our entire economic system.

That means three of the ten are represented in American jurisprudence. However, those are the three that are represented in every system of jurisprudence anywhere, and always have been - even before Moses went up that mountain.

11 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 03/27/2015 at 12:49 PM

Re: “The Ten Commandments in front of government buildings? We might be better off as a society if we just erected a plaque with the words of Abraham Lincoln, instead

I think about that part about graven images every time I encounter yet another nativity scene on government property. The first four commandments are all about telling us which god to worship and how. That isn't a part of American jurisprudence and isn't a foundation of American law. That means we've immediately eliminated 40% of the commandments. How many others apply?

Anyone who has ever been a victim of parental abuse or neglect has pretty good grounds for ignoring the fifth commandment, which is not encoded anywhere in our laws - common law or statutory.

There is no law against adultery. The Arkansas legislature even did away with the civil penalties for it when, in the 1970's, it repealed a cause of action for "alienation of affection."

As for the last two commandments - we live in a capitalist society. Capitalism is built upon coveting what we don't have and purchasing it. If these two commandments were enforced, it would spell the end of our entire economic system. Some people may think that's a good idea. I'd like to see what alternative they'd propose first, though.

So we're left with three.

Moses wasn't the first person to present the idea of not taking other people's stuff or killing them for no good reason. Nor was he the first say that lying about important things is a terrible idea. Those three actually are part of our laws - but they are also part of every system of laws everywhere, even places where no one has ever worshipped the same god that allegedly etched those stone tablets for Moses.

Three of the ten commandments (out of a total of more than 600 that are found in the Old Testament) are represented in American jurisprudence. However, those are the three that are represented in every system of jurisprudence anywhere, and always have been - even before Moses supposedly went up that mountain.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Anne Bonney, Pirate on 03/26/2015 at 4:43 PM

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