Adding dimension 

Sculpture gallery to open.


On the heels of Sculpture at the River Market, the venture by the city and the National Sculptors Guild in Colorado to promote the art form a couple of weekends ago at the River Market, comes a new gallery devoted to work in three dimensions: C.C. Taylor Gallery at 1601-B Rebsamen Park Road.

One of Arkansas's band of sculptors who participated in the River Market show is included among the seven artists who open C.C. Taylor on Nov. 2: Michael Warrick. Warrick, a professor at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, will show small, organic bronzes. Other artists are Scott Carroll of Fayetteville, who also works in bronze; Keith Newton and gallery owner Tony Dilday, both Little Rock woodworkers; Jack Slentz of Santa Fe, who works in wood, rubber and other media; Dave Frazier of Wye Mountain, an ironworker; and Willard Miller of Little Rock, a stone mason.

Dilday, who combined the names of his children to create the gallery's name, said the venue will feature “organic art that goes beyond the ordinary.” The gallery is located behind Cynthia East Fabrics. A preview of the work to be shown can be found on the gallery's website at www.cctaylorgallery.com.

Two kinetic sculptures purchased at the Sculpture at the River Market event will be placed in the Riverfront Park Adventure Playground.

Mary and Jim Wohlleb purchased and donated to the city the 8-foot-tall “Crane Unfolding,” and Mary's mother, Ruth Remmell, purchased and donated the 7-foot-tall “Plane Folding,” both stainless steel origami sculptures by Ken Box of Austin, Texas. The Wohllebs' gift honors their children and grandchildren.

Guild executive director John Kinkade said the sculpture show was a success, with sales reaching $250,000. From that, $50,000 will go to the City in a Park Conservancy and Land Trust, Kinkade said.

The exhibit was the first of three that will be held at the River Market pavilions over three years.

First Lady Ginger Beebe will autograph copies of the 2008 Arkansas Artists Engagement Calendar, a fund-raiser for the Governor's Mansion, from 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, Oct. 18, at the Red Door Gallery, 3715 John F. Kennedy Blvd.

The stiff-backed, spiral-bound calendar features 88 works by Arkansas artists, so in addition to its obvious function as a calendar it also serves as the only printed catalog and showcase of work being made in state today. As such, it would have been nice if the art could have stood alone, filling as much of the page as possible, and the sponsor logos placed on pages not featuring art.

The calendars are $20 and may be purchased at the gallery, in bookstores, online at www.arkansasgma.gov or by calling the mansion at 324-9805.

The Fine Arts Club of Arkansas is chartering a bus for a Nov. 1 trip to Memphis to see impressionist paintings at the Brooks Museum and the Dixon Gallery and Gardens.

The Brooks is showing “Pissaro: Creating the Impressionist Landscape,” 39 paintings from private and museum collections. The Dixon is showing American impressionism from the Phillips Collection.

The bus will leave from the Arkansas Arts Center at 8 a.m. and return at 6 p.m. To reserve a seat, call 396-0351. The $65 ticket includes transportation, a snack, museum fees and lunch. The trip will start at the Brooks, with lunch at the museum's Brushmark Restaurant, and wrap up at the Dixon.




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