Favorite

Anthology of Arkansas Folksongs 

click to enlarge MUSIC PRESERVATIONIST: Mary C. Parler.
  • MUSIC PRESERVATIONIST: Mary C. Parler.
With its rich music and culture, the Ozarks area is probably the most-studied region of the state. A small selection of a large collection of mainly Ozark Arkansas folksongs has been put on a two-disc box set coming out of Fayetteville. The “Anthology of Arkansas Folksongs” features 57 of the approximately 4,000 performances found in the Mary C. Parler Archive of Arkansas Folk Music. Professor Mary Celestia Parler and her assistants recorded at least 600 Arkansas instrumentalists and singers from 1949 through 1965, with an emphasis on the Ozarks. The box set was edited by Alan Spurgeon, Rachel Reynolds and Bob Cochran, and issued by Fayetteville’s Center for Arkansas and Regional Studies. Parler’s model in collecting the performances was folklorist Vance Randolph, who had been studying Ozark folkways for years, and whose masterwork four-volume “Ozark Folk Songs” was gaining notice as Parler started her recording work. Parler’s collection is maintained by the Special Collections Division of the University of Arkansas Library at Fayetteville. Disc one opens with “Arkansas Boarding House,” recorded in 1960 in Benton. The song is performed by Charles Mayo, music minister of First Baptist Church in Benton. Mayo said he learned the song from his father, C.R. Mayo. “I don’t know where he learned it,” he says, “and never heard it anyplace except when he sang it.” So-called “play-party” songs also appear on the “Anthology of Arkansas Folksongs.” Play-party songs date from frontier times and were a way for young people to entertain themselves and interact with the opposite sex. Aleta Garrison Jessup recorded one, “Marching Round the Levee,” in Little Rock in 1959. Columbus Vaughn was recorded in Wayton in 1954. Vaughn was a teacher at Deer High School in Newton County. His “There’s a Hole in the Bottom of the Sea” is a well-known campfire song. A 1963 recording from an unknown location features Bailey Dansey, one of many tantalizing characters from the collection. Little is known of Dansey. Identified only as a “blind Negro midget from southeast Arkansas,” Dansey’s bluesy song is called “Gabriel Blows His Silver Trumpet.” Others of note appear on disc one, including Ronnie Hawkins of St. Paul, Cleburne County native Almeda Riddle and Jimmie “Driftwood” Morris and Ollie Gilbert, both of Timbo. Booth Campbell, who dressed in a Confederate Army uniform, was a well-known performer at folk festivals, and contributes “State of Arkansas,” recorded in Cane Hill. Folklorist Vance Randolph collected five different versions of “State of Arkansas.” The song recounts an outsider’s awful time in the state, working draining land near Fort Smith. First, Little Rock gives “his heart a shock” for unnamed reasons; by the end, he’s “going to the Indian nation and marry me a squaw,” rather than return to the state. Booth Campbell’s version was recorded 1950. Campbell died six years later at age 84. His is just one of 31 songs from disc one of the “Anthology of Arkansas Folksongs.” Next week: Disc two. listening • “State of Arkansas” • “Arkansas Boarding House” • “Gabriel Blows His Silver Trumpet” • “Marching Round the Levee” • “There’s a Hole in the Bottom of the Sea” • “Jenny for Jenny”
Favorite

Tags:

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

More by Stephen Koch

Most Shared

  • Department of Arkansas Heritage archeologist resigns

    Bob Scoggin, 50, the Department of Arkansas Heritage archeologist whose job it was to review the work of agencies, including DAH and the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, for possible impacts on historic properties, resigned from the agency on Monday. Multiple sources say Scoggin, whom they describe as an "exemplary" employee who the week before had completed an archeological project on DAH property, was told he would be fired if he did not resign.
  • Labor department director inappropriately expensed out-of-state trips, audit finds

    Jones was "Minority Outreach Coordinator" for Hutchinson's 2014 gubernatorial campaign. The governor first named him as policy director before placing him over the labor department instead in Jan. 2015, soon after taking office.
  • Lawsuit filed against ADC officials, prison chaplain convicted of sexual assault at McPherson

    A former inmate who claims she was sexually assaulted over 70 times by former McPherson Womens' Unit chaplain Kenneth Dewitt has filed a federal lawsuit against Dewitt, several staff members at the prison, and officials with the Arkansas Department of Corrections, including former director Ray Hobbs.
  • Rapert compares Bill Clinton to Orval Faubus

    Sen. Jason Rapert (R-Conway)  was on "Capitol View" on KARK, Channel 4, this morning, and among other things that will likely inspire you to yell at your computer screen, he said he expects someone in the legislature to file a bill to do ... something about changing the name of the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport.

Latest in Arkansongs

  • Floyd Cramer's country keys

    Floyd Cramer, who grew up in Huttig, became one of the most important piano players in the development of country music.
    • May 3, 2007
  • Dorough finds his voice

    From his beginnings in Cherry Hill, Bob Dorough knew music was his thing.
    • Mar 15, 2007
  • ‘Sunday Afternoon’

    Soundtrack album forges on without film.
    • Jan 25, 2007
  • More »

Visit Arkansas

Arkansas remembers Pearl Harbor

Arkansas remembers Pearl Harbor

Central Arkansas venues have a full week of commemorative events planned

Event Calendar

« »

December

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation