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Arkansas Black Independent Film Festival 

THURSDAY 9/6-SUNDAY 9/9

ARKANSAS BLACK INDEPENDENT FILM FESTIVAL

6 p.m. Mosaic Templars Cultural Center. $40.

The Arkansas Black Independent Film Festival, founded by Wayne and Angela Burt, has grown from a one-day event to a four-day festival featuring nationally known artists and filmmakers. This year marks the seventh installment of the film fest, and things get started Thursday with a red-carpet screening of White Hall native Dui Jarrod's film "Lesson Before Love," at 6 p.m. at the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center. There will also be live music from Rodney Block & The Real Music Lovers. Friday's lineup starts at 11 a.m. at Philander Smith College and Arkansas Baptist College, with selected shorts, features and documentaries. At Arkansas Baptist, filmmaker Julie Dash screens "Daughters of the Dust" and hosts a Q&A starting at 1 p.m., followed by a screenwriting workshop led by Jarrod at 4 p.m. At Philander Smith, filmmaker and author M.K. Asante screens "The Black Candle," followed by a Q&A, starting at 7 p.m. There are more screenings and a variety of workshops on Saturday at both campuses, and things wrap up Sunday with a brunch with Dash from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., and an awards ceremony and more starting at 6 p.m. at Dreamland Ballroom. More info is available at arbiff.com. Tickets range from $10-$40, or you can get a festival pass for $75.

THURSDAY 9/6

GLEN CAMPBELL

7:30 p.m. Robinson Center Music Hall. $50-$94.

What else is there to say about Glen Campbell? He's one of the all-time legends of country music. He's an ace guitar player, having lent his chops to innumerable hit recordings alongside the other members of the famed Wrecking Crew. He played in the Beach Boys in 1965, filling in for a fragile Brian Wilson. He sold millions and millions of records, enjoying both critical and popular success and earning numerous Grammys. He starred alongside John Wayne and Kim Darby in "True Grit" (and again with Darby in "Norwood," also based on a Charles Portis novel). He hosted his own TV shows. He's had his troubles and wild times, sure. But he's also had a lifelong career that brought joy to millions of music lovers. And he's from Arkansas. On his final tour, you can be sure the Little Rock crowd will give him a warm welcome home.

FRIDAY 9/7

THE MAIN THING: 'ELECTILE DYSFUNCTION'

8 p.m. The Joint. $20.

"Electile Dysfunction" is the newest two-act satire from The Main Thing, the resident comedy company at The Joint in North Little Rock. Main Thing stars Joint owners Steve and Vicki Farrell and Brett Ihler and, as is apparent from the title, will skewer national politics and the upcoming presidential election, all through an Arkansas-specific lens. According to a presser from the troupe, the show concerns a Little Rock family that can't see eye-to-eye on politics. They become minor celebrities after a local action news team turns its investigative eye on their disagreements. I haven't been to check out The Main Thing yet, but I've heard very good things from several trusted sources. The Farrells aren't natives of Arkansas, but no less an authority than Times publisher Alan Leveritt told me that they have an uncanny grasp on the nuances of Central Arkansas politics. He raved about their last show, "Little Rock and a Hard Place," and said he and his father-in-law were in stitches.

FRIDAY 9/7

RALPHIE MAY

8:30 p.m. Robinson Center Music Hall. $40-$55.

This is the week for Arkansas boys made good coming back home. The day after legendary musician and Delight native Glen Campbell plays Robinson, Clarksville native and standup comic Ralphie May will take to that same storied stage. May recently chatted with Times contributor Philip M. Provost (check out the full interview at arktimes.com/ralphiemay). Here's May discussing how he got started in comedy: "I got to enter a contest to open for Sam Kinison when I was 17. This was 1989, and he was the pinnacle of standup at the time. He pulled a prank on me: He told me to say the wrong thing, to scream and yell at the audience, to tell them they're all stupid. It got me booed, and then he came on stage and said, 'Can you believe that kid, talking to people like that? He'll be crying backstage, thinking his comedy career is over, he'll never be in comedy again.' But Sam loved me, he said it went perfectly."

FRIDAY 9/7

'GOOD PEOPLE'

7:30 p.m. The Weekend Theater. $12-$16.

David Lindsay-Abaire's "Good People" concerns South Boston native Margie, a hardworking single mom of a disabled child, who gets fired from her job as a cashier. For help, she turns to Mike, an old boyfriend and now a highly successful doctor. Variety critic Marilyn Stasio called "Good People" a "tough and tender play about the insurmountable class divide between those who make it out of this blue-collar Irish neighborhood and those who find themselves left behind." Frances McDormand won a Tony for her portrayal of Margie, and "Good People" was also nominated for Best Play. "It's a very thought-provoking and entertaining show," director Andy Hall said in a press release. "It is about the economic times, but more than that, it's about people — we all have different sides, we're many shades of gray." The Weekend Theater's production of "Good People" runs Fridays and Saturdays through Sept. 17. Directed by Andy Hall.

SATURDAY 9/8

ARKANSAS VS. LOUISIANA-MONROE

6 p.m. War Memorial Stadium. $55.

Let's just get it out of the way: Saturday's Razorbacks season opener against Jacksonville State probably didn't impress too many people. But I think the serious analysis is best left in the capable hands of Times Hog expert Beau Wilcox, whose Pearls About Swine column elsewhere in this issue will no doubt include many cogent points about that game and this one. I'll just say that this has likely been as weird a preseason as Hogs observers have seen — which is really saying something — and that fans are understandably both hopeful and anxious, especially after an underwhelming opener. But here's the rub: Are the Hogs your team? Yes? OK, then let's all just take a deep breath and remember that this is one of only two opportunities fans will have this year for War Memorial tailgating, and perhaps one of only a handful we'll ever have again. So get down there, have some fun, eat some grilled grub and try to remain vertical until kickoff at least. WPS!

MONDAY 9/10

LITTLE FEAT

8 p.m. Revolution. $25.

It was about 41 years ago that a quartet called Little Feat released its self-titled debut album on Warner Bros. It was an idiosyncratic amalgam of folk, rock and bluesy country that didn't sell real well back then, but over time has become recognized as a stone-cold classic that has only gotten better with the years. The band took a turn in a different direction after that, toward a funkier, more stretched-out sound. But the great playing and songwriting remained over several classic albums released throughout the '70s. The group disbanded in 1979, after the death of founding member Lowell George at the age of 34. They got back together in 1988, adding Arkansan Fred Tackett to the lineup. Tackett had written songs for George's solo album "Thanks, I'll Eat Here" and had played on several Little Feat albums (he and longtime Feat guitarist Paul Barrere play in an acoustic duo as well). "Let it Roll," the first album from the new lineup, was a hit, with "Hate to Lose Your Lovin'" hitting No. 1 on Billboard's Mainstream Rock chart. The band has toured and released albums ever since, with a consistently incredible live show and a dedicated following among fellow musicians and especially among jam-band fans. In 2009, founding drummer Richie Hayward announced that he had liver disease and he wouldn't be able to play. The band's drum tech, Gabe Ford, filled in and became a full-time member after Hayward passed away in 2010. Little Feat's latest album, "Rooster Rag," came out in June. It's the band's first studio album in nearly a decade, and it's a very solid collection of tunes, featuring four numbers written by Feat co-founder Bill Payne and Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter and covers of blues classics by Willie Dixon and the great Mississippi John Hurt, whose slyly dirty "Candy Man Blues" gets a funky treatment to open the album. The opening act is The Villains.

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