Be warned 

'The Raid 2' may be unlike anything you've seen before.

'THE RAID 2': Iko Uwais and Cecep Arif Rahman star.
  • 'THE RAID 2': Iko Uwais and Cecep Arif Rahman star.

"The Raid 2," a martial arts epic so ultraviolent and spectacular it arrives almost as a surprise in American theaters, will surprise no one who saw its predecessor, "The Raid: Redemption," with its audacity and ferocity. However, if you missed out on everyone's favorite Indonesian shoot-'em-up cop classic in 2011, then you might need a bit of a primer on the sequel. A movie this dangerous, in fact, could really use a feature-length disclaimer.

WARNING: "The Raid 2" is unsafe to view if you are pregnant, may become pregnant, may impregnate someone, or were born as the result of a pregnancy.

Do not see "The Raid 2" if you are allergic to the sight of blood spraying, blood pooling in snow, blood rushing out of freshly cut necks, bones snapping like celery, heads getting pounded against hard surfaces, faces getting pressed onto hot surfaces, bullets zipping into moving vehicles, people getting shot, people getting ripped apart with blades, people getting unzipped with claw hammers, bodies being dumped into public water supplies, or peanuts.

Avoid "The Raid 2" if you are not keen on subtitles. With all there is to see on-screen, your eye may miss some of the finer plot points and names. Alternatively, you can buff up your Indonesian ahead of time.

Reconsider seeing "The Raid 2" if you are claustrophobic, germophobic or hew to the immaculate. The movie picks up two hours after the previous film left off, and is decidedly more convoluted in its presentation. Iko Uwais, the main cop from the first "Raid," is back, this time under extremely deep cover. He moves to get close to a nefarious crime lord by getting thrown in prison and befriending the man's son (Arifin Putra). This leads to a couple of memorably intense combat scenes: One in a bathroom stall and one medieval riot in a Javanese prison yard in a soft-serve morass of mud. Brutality and filth ensue.

"The Raid 2" should not be seen by children, unless their parents are away for at least 2.5 hours, because the movie is long and those parents would be shocked to see most of the insane fight scenes, such as the one where an old assassin has to fight his way out of a nightclub using only fists, furniture and the occasional broken bottle, or the one in which our undercover hero and his adopted gang have to shoot their way out of a botched shakedown of a putrid pornography den.

The makers of "The Raid 2" cannot be held responsible if, after watching several people beaten to death with a metal baseball bat, you never see America's pastime quite the same way again.

In brutality and ambition, "The Raid 2" will make other action movies seem pusillanimous by comparison. Director/writer Gareth Evans clearly is attempting to craft an organized crime movie with the intergenerational pathos of "The Godfather" with a typhoon of top-quality hand-to-hand combat, sick car chases and operatic death sequences. There is no shame in falling shy of "The Godfather" when a filmmaker succeeds in his other goals. So you've been warned: You may want to watch it a second time.



Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Sam Eifling

Readers also liked…

  • Gay diamonds

    Scenes from Rodeo in the Rock.
    • May 7, 2015
  • Not much to 'Love'

    In Judd Apatow's new Netflix original series.
    • Feb 25, 2016

Most Shared

  • Issue 3: blank check

    Who could object to a constitutional amendment "concerning job creation, job expansion and economic development," which is the condensed title for Issue 3 for Arkansas voters on Nov. 8?
  • Little Rock police kill man downtown

    Little Rock police responding to a disturbance call near Eighth and Sherman Streets about 12:40 a.m. killed a man with a long gun, Police Chief Kenton Buckner said in an early morning meeting with reporters.
  • From the mind of Sol LeWitt: Crystal Bridges 'Loopy Doopy': A correction

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is installing Sol Lewitt's 70-foot eye-crosser "Wall Drawing 880: Loopy Doopy," waves of complementary orange and green, on the outside of the Twentieth Century Gallery bridge. You can glimpse painters working on it from Eleven, the museum's restaurant, museum spokeswoman Beth Bobbitt said
  • Ted Suhl loses another bid for new trial; faces stiff sentencing recommendation

    Ted Suhl, the former operator of residential and out-patient mental health services, has lost a second bid to get a new trial on his conviction for paying bribes to influence state Human Services Department policies. Set for sentencing Thursday, Suhl faces a government request for a sentence up to almost 20 years. He argues for no more than 33 months.
  • Football and foster kids

    It took a football stadium to lay bare Republican budget hypocrisy in Arkansas.

Latest in Movie Reviews

Visit Arkansas

Jodi Morris's lifelong ties to the National Park Service

Jodi Morris's lifelong ties to the National Park Service

"History is always happening" at Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site

Event Calendar

« »


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Good Weather

    • Congratulations Tara, beautifully written!

    • on October 27, 2016

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation