Brought to life 

Clay and landscapes at the Arkansas Arts Center.

click to enlarge 'MARCH': Day by day at the shore, by Ben Whitehouse.
  • 'MARCH': Day by day at the shore, by Ben Whitehouse.

Thanks to the medium of video, the Ben Whitehouse and Jun Kaneko exhibits at the Arkansas Arts Center require more than just a casual drop-in. Whitehouse's real-time video landscapes — of Central Park, a bowl of fruit and the Lake Michigan shore — are hypnotic. So is the soundless video showing Kaneko in the process of building and firing his enormous ceramic sculptures, cutting, pounding, pinching, stacking, painting; the first image is the sun rising, the last is the moon.

There is so much going on in these fine exhibits that words fail, both visually and intellectually. Whitehouse's large-scale paintings of distant shores and luminous lakes and big sky and Kaneko's giant “dangos” and bird's egg blue Buddha head are gorgeous works of art. Whitehouse's digital videos (24 hours long) are his attempt at creating living landscape. Though he is a deft painter, he wants to capture more.

In the Jeannette Rockefeller gallery, “Revolution: Bowl of Fruit” video is still life and unstill life, both cerebral and funny. The bowl of fruit is unchanging; the landscape, seen through a window in the background, is ever-changing, leaves blowing in a wind, people walking on the beach.

The constant break of the waves on the shore of Lake Michigan in another video (which also uses sound to great effect) is nature unstoppable. The video of Central Park, shot from above, captures the sunlight's slip from across the Sheep Meadow, the skating rink, the vast stretch of trees in fall, until the park is in shadow. Only the movement of the skaters isn't subtle.

Along with his traditional landscape paintings is “March,” a collection of square canvasses, arranged like a calendar, depicting a place on the shore, each day different from the last.

In the Wolfe gallery, Kaneko's 6- and 7-foot dangos stand like pieces of the landscape removed from Whitehouse's two-dimensional reality. One, zigzagged in gold and blue lines, is like a smooth glazed cactus. There are also those that can't be translated into something organic, like the black-and-white-striped lozenge that, like a large abstract painting, makes design monumental. An observer can get lost in the moonscape surface of the Buddha head.

The exhibit runs through Aug. 2.


Greg Thompson, a private dealer in fine art, will open a gallery in downtown North Little Rock this Friday, coinciding with Argenta's Third Friday Art Walk this Friday.

Greg Thompson Fine Art,  on the 2nd floor of the Faucett Building at 429 Main St., will exhibit work by famed Southern painters Carroll Cloar, Thomas Hart Benton, Clementine Hunter, Theora Hamblett and Walter Anderson. Thompson also represents Arkansas artists J.O. Buckley, George Dombek, Matt McLeod, A.J. Smith, Barry Thomas and Rebecca Thompson. Third Friday Art Walk runs from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at galleries and other venues on and off Main Street.


Stephano's Gallery at 5501 Kavanaugh Blvd. in the Heights is reaching out to collectors with shrunk pocketbooks with the event “Art for Today's Economics” from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. June 25. The gallery features work by Hank Gatlin, Chris Runyan, David Bell, Leslie Baldwin, Les Galusha, Catherine Christie, Laura Holthoff, Stephano Sutherlin and others.




Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Leslie Newell Peacock

  • Coming to McLeod: Hursley and Simmons, land and dreamscapes

    Heads up for Thursday, Oct. 27: Matt McLeod Fine Art Gallery opens "Landscapes/Dreamscapes: At the Crossroads of Observation and Memory," an exhibition of drawings and paintings by Little Rock artists Jeanie Lockeby Hursley and  Dominique Simmons. 
    • Oct 21, 2016
  • Good Weather, outdoors and in (Elliott Earls)

    If you read this week's Arts and Entertainment feature on Good Weather Gallery, you are probably wanting to know a little bit more about the show opening tomorrow, Oct. 22: Elliott Earls' "Death of a Salesman."
    • Oct 21, 2016
  • White Water gets Southern Salted

    Lauren McCants, the Southern Salt Co. food truck founder and chef, is now serving food at the White Water Tavern Tuesday and Thursday through Saturday. On the menu: hamburgers and cheeseburgers (of course) as well as deep fried pork tenderloin sandwiches, deep fried chicken sandwiches, a smoked bologna and over-easy egg sandwich (real good, she says), chicken nachos and a special, like coconut curried chicken. There are vegetarian options, as well: Deep-fried tofu sandwiches, prepared with avocado and like a fish taco; and sweet potato and avocado tacos.
    • Oct 21, 2016
  • More »

Most Shared

Latest in Art Notes

Visit Arkansas

Logoly State Park dedicates new visitors center

Logoly State Park dedicates new visitors center

Arkansas’s first environmental education state park interprets the importance of the natural world and our place within it.

Event Calendar

« »


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

Most Viewed

  • Good Weather

    Lakewood pop-up gallery makes a home for art in limbo.
  • Lessons learned

    Picture Bret Bielema pole-vaulting for a minute. Then, once the laughter subsides, hear me out with this absurd analogy.
  • Ken Bonfield comes to The Joint

    Also, Guts Club plays Vino's.
  • White Water hosts a big Mississippi Blues Show

    Also, Red Octopus at the Public Theater, Alcee Chriss III at First Presbyterian Church, Harvestfest in Hillcrest, the Arkansas Times Hog Roast, Wildflower Revue at South on Main and Made By Few in Bentonville.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Lessons learned

    • I think you meant to write, 'Consider for a minute Bret Bielema pole vaulting.' As…

    • on October 20, 2016
  • Re: Good Weather

    • Great article, true words!! Good Weather is an amazing place.

    • on October 20, 2016

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation