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Clean streets, lower crime rate 

Clean streets, lower crime rate

The crime rate in Little Rock is higher than it has been in decades and our city is now the 64th top performer in violent crime in the U.S. An average Little Rock citizen has a 1 in 13 chance of being a victim of a theft crime and a 1 in 72 chance of being a victim of a violent crime. Hope is not lost for Little Rock, however, for other cities have faced the same problem. For example, New York City reported a 51 percent decrease of theft and a 72 percent decrease in violent crimes by using a version of the Broken Windows theory. The theory claims that if an area is rundown then it will appear to be lawless and attract negative activity. If Little Rock cleaned up of these rundown areas, then there would be no attraction for the lawless, and in response Little Rock's crime rate would drop significantly. Another result of cleaner streets would be an increase in tourism, spiking the economy of Little Rock and the profits of the small business owners. Not only would the crime rate drop, but all of Little Rock would reap the benefits of cleaner streets.

John Redding

Little Rock

Against 2223

I am not at all surprised that the group supporting [Eureka Springs' equal rights] Ordinance 2223 has had to dig 40 years into a man's history to come up with a talking point. Please note: They are not sticking to the facts. Fact 1: that this ordinance was pushed through at the end of the city council meeting without a fair hearing or time for rebuttal. Fact 2: that state law prohibits cities from passing an ordinance having to do with discrimination. That is under the purview of the state of Arkansas.

They know the law is unenforceable and I would further submit to you that they know they don't have a leg to stand on, so they have engaged in the typical political ploy: completely change the subject so people will stop looking directly at the issue and instead engage in "ain't it awful." This group of people's true agenda is to divide our city into "us" and "them," which is the basic goal of most government offices. Keep raising a ruckus and not look at the facts.

As for Mr. Turner, he needs no defending. If you have to dig 40 years into a man's past to come up with some "dirt" on him, that probably means for the last 40 years he's been doing just fine.

Your paper has served the troublemakers as a divisive tool, which was their goal in the first place.

Pamela Stewart

Eureka Springs

From the web

In response to the Times' April 23 cover story, "What will Eureka do?":

First, I must thank Stephen King for allowing David free access to your literary channeling service and for only requiring a small plug for "The Shining" in payment.

In other words: Wonderful introduction to your insightful article, Mr. Koon! A hook such as this is sometimes necessary in order to lure a Philistine like myself to read an educational piece. I'm now much more informed about the current controversy up in Eureka Springs.

It's also left me grinning like a skeleton at the wheel of a wrecked Packard at the bottom of a hidden ravine somewhere in the Ozark Mountains.

Olphart

Good thing the legislative session is over. Otherwise, the bigot brigade led by Sen. Bart Hester and Rep. Bob Ballinger would be trying to pass a bill banning Bruce Jenner from coming to Arkansas. Small minds from wide gaps in the road trying to tell the rest of us how to live.

How about a vote to ban these two from Eureka Springs and Fayetteville?

philbilly

In response to "A child beaten, slain despite red flags" (April 23):

As a former caseworker this article is hard to read. Caseworkers are not psychic. They have to process investigations with the information available to them. An investigation entails meeting with the reporter, meeting with the child and meeting with the alleged offenders. The investigators see the home. If the worker and their supervisor could not find a reason to substantiate the allegations, then DHS is out of their lives. In some cases they can open what is called a supportive service case where they think the family could benefit from services. If an investigation was properly done and there was an unsubstantiated finding, then DHS is not culpable. Did the investigator search for the parents' names? I do not know. Were there issues with the system not picking up the previous cases? I do not know. The simple fact is this: Caseworkers are underpaid, overworked and have a very high turnover/burn-out rate. Caseworkers take the brunt of the abuse from the parents, kids, foster parents, judges and the system in general. We need less blaming DHS and more overhauling the system so cases don't fall through the cracks and children and families can get the services they need.

oneofthemdamnlesbians

Once a person has had a child removed from his or her custody for abuse, especially six confirmed physical and sexual abuse reports, then part of the punishment immediately should be to tie their tubes or give them a vasectomy. I know someone above said people can change, however, this man abused two sets of children and was allowed to have more babies in order to abuse them. Totally disgusting. Children need advocates. If people can't be good parents, then I don't think they should physically be capable of producing children. This is ridiculous. We are in the same state and the system failed. As the older son said, so much could have been done. We have an overpopulation problem on this earth. The last thing we need is more deviant people reproducing.

thetruthhurts

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