Favorite

Email, again 

Assuming that the bizarre 2016 presidential campaign does not represent the new normal, the great Hillary Clinton email snipe hunt will go down as the most preposterous presidential election issue ever.

Just as the email furor seemed about to subside, the forlorn FBI director, James B. Comey, revived it by telling Congress that some emails in the computer of sex pervert Anthony Weiner might have something to do with Clinton, the boss of Weiner's estranged wife, although it could be meaningless. Clinton sagged in the polls, Donald Trump surged, and his crowds roared "lock her up" with new fury.

To Trump, Comey went from loser to man of principle, and Republicans praised him, but Democrats and former Republican Justice Department officials blamed him for inserting the FBI into a political campaign in violation of longstanding policy.

Comey was a lifelong Republican and a high Bush administration official who sank more than $20,000 into the campaigns of John McCain and Mitt Romney, who ran against Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012, but canceled his party registration after Obama made him FBI director in 2013. He has waffled from one side to the other to try to prove that he is nonpartisan, first announcing that the FBI had found no evidence that Clinton had committed a crime by using the government server and then saying the FBI was going to look again. After his murky note to Congress about Weiner's emails, he sent a longer one to FBI colleagues explaining that regardless of the likelihood that there was nothing damaging for Clinton he was obliged to keep Congress abreast of things.

Clinton's public approval ratings after leaving the State Department were sky-high before her bête noire, the New York Times, disclosed that she had used a private server while she was secretary of state. Media coverage mushroomed and Republicans made it the crime of the century. Might she have inadvertently revealed secrets to Russia or Middle Eastern jihadists, such as the identities of CIA agents or the fact that the CIA was killing civilians in drone attacks in Pakistan and Yemen? The Russians or WikiLeaks' Julian Assange might have hacked into her server, although Trump urged them to do it and investigators found no evidence that they had.

WikiLeaks had, however, published online millions of secret documents from electronic government files, including many that were indeed damaging to national security. Assange's interference in the election on Trump's behalf, not Clinton's emails, may yet prove to be the story of the year. Clinton had denounced WikiLeaks' attacks on national security and called for Assange's prosecution. (He is ensconced in the Ecuadorian embassy in London, enjoying immunity from extradition to Sweden, where he is wanted for sex crimes.)

The real oddity of the campaign is the assertion by Trump, Republican congressmen and crowds that Clinton should be locked up for using a private server when policy seemed to dictate that people use government domains for official business, even if no harm to national security had been shown. The law is the law, they say, and anyone but her would be prosecuted.

If that were true, thousands would be in jail, including former Secretary of State Colin Powell, whose advice led to Clinton's using a private server like he did, and nearly everyone in the George W. Bush White House. Memories are too short.

Using a private server was a boneheaded error by Hillary Clinton, one of a long stretch of them she has made throughout her public life, from what has always appeared to be a pathological fear of public scrutiny of what she does and writes, but she is not alone.

A few people at least ought to remember the Bush administration email scandal, which surfaced ever so briefly in 2007 when Congress looked into White House-directed firings of seven U.S. attorneys, including our own good Republican (and now Trump state director) Bud Cummins.

It turned out that, sometime after the Iraq invasion, units in the White House converted from a government server to servers run by the Republican National Committee. Eventually, the White House explained that it had decided that the White House political operations run by Karl Rove (and including Arkansas aide Tim Griffin) were violating the Hatch Act, which prohibits political work on government time and facilities, so they converted to domains run by the Republican Party, gwb43.com, mchq.org and georgewbush.com. Other facets of government began to use them, too, because the media could not access them through the Freedom of Information Act. Rove and others eventually deleted at least 22 million emails to avoid their recovery. It was a clear violation of the Presidential Records Act, a post-Watergate reform that made it a crime to destroy presidential records.

Congressional committees were not interested in pursuing the scandal. The media reaction was ho-hum. It did not involve a Clinton.

Favorite

Speaking of Hillary Clinton

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

More by Ernest Dumas

  • Fake news

    So fed up was young Edgar Welch of Salisbury, N.C., that Hillary Clinton was getting away with running a child-sex ring that he grabbed a couple of guns last Sunday, drove 360 miles to the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria in Washington, D.C., where Clinton was supposed to be holding the kids as sex slaves, and fired his AR-15 into the floor to clear the joint of pizza cravers and conduct his own investigation of the pedophilia syndicate of the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state.
    • Dec 8, 2016
  • Fake economics

    Fake news is a new phenomenon in the world of politics and policy, but hokey economic scholarship has been around as long as Form 1040 and is about as reliable as the news hoaxes that enlivened the presidential campaign.
    • Dec 1, 2016
  • China in charge

    Let's turn to foreign affairs to see how we might calm the flood of anxieties over the coming Donald Trump presidency.
    • Nov 24, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Religion as excuse upends Constitution

    Tirades over religious liberty since the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriages nationwide have awakened the ghost of James Madison, the author of the constitutional doctrine on the matter, and it isn't happy that his effort to protect religious inquiry in America is being corrupted.
    • Jul 9, 2015
  • Guns, God and gays

    Many more mass shootings like the one last week in Roseburg, Ore., will stain the future and no law will pass that might reduce the carnage. That is not a prediction but a fact of life that is immune even to Hillary Clinton.
    • Oct 8, 2015
  • AEC dumps ALEC

    No matter which side of the battle over global warming you're on, that was blockbuster news last week. No, not the signing of the climate-change treaty that commits all of Earth's 195 nations to lowering their greenhouse-gas emissions and slowing the heating of the planet, but American Electric Power's announcement that it would no longer underwrite efforts to block renewable energy or federal smokestack controls in the United States.
    • Dec 17, 2015

Most Shared

  • World leaders set to meet in Little Rock on resource access and sustainable development

    Next week a series of meetings on the use of technology to tackle global problems will be held in Little Rock by Club de Madrid — a coalition of more than 100 former democratic former presidents and prime ministers from around the world — and the P80 Group, a coalition of large public pension and sovereign wealth funds founded by Prince Charles to combat climate change. The conference will discuss deploying existing technologies to increase access to food, water, energy, clean environment, and medical care.
  • Tomb to table: a Christmas feast offered by the residents of Mount Holly and other folk

    Plus, recipes from the Times staff.
  • Rapert compares Bill Clinton to Orval Faubus

    Sen. Jason Rapert (R-Conway)  was on "Capitol View" on KARK, Channel 4, this morning, and among other things that will likely inspire you to yell at your computer screen, he said he expects someone in the legislature to file a bill to do ... something about changing the name of the Bill and Hillary Clinton National Airport.
  • Fake news

    So fed up was young Edgar Welch of Salisbury, N.C., that Hillary Clinton was getting away with running a child-sex ring that he grabbed a couple of guns last Sunday, drove 360 miles to the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria in Washington, D.C., where Clinton was supposed to be holding the kids as sex slaves, and fired his AR-15 into the floor to clear the joint of pizza cravers and conduct his own investigation of the pedophilia syndicate of the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state.
  • Reality TV prez

    There is almost nothing real about "reality TV." All but the dullest viewers understand that the dramatic twists and turns on shows like "The Bachelor" or "Celebrity Apprentice" are scripted in advance. More or less like professional wrestling, Donald Trump's previous claim to fame.

Latest in Ernest Dumas

  • Fake news

    So fed up was young Edgar Welch of Salisbury, N.C., that Hillary Clinton was getting away with running a child-sex ring that he grabbed a couple of guns last Sunday, drove 360 miles to the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria in Washington, D.C., where Clinton was supposed to be holding the kids as sex slaves, and fired his AR-15 into the floor to clear the joint of pizza cravers and conduct his own investigation of the pedophilia syndicate of the former first lady, U.S. senator and secretary of state.
    • Dec 8, 2016
  • Fake economics

    Fake news is a new phenomenon in the world of politics and policy, but hokey economic scholarship has been around as long as Form 1040 and is about as reliable as the news hoaxes that enlivened the presidential campaign.
    • Dec 1, 2016
  • China in charge

    Let's turn to foreign affairs to see how we might calm the flood of anxieties over the coming Donald Trump presidency.
    • Nov 24, 2016
  • More »

Visit Arkansas

View Trumpeter Swans in Heber Springs

View Trumpeter Swans in Heber Springs

Magness Lake, in Heber Springs, is a magnet for swans

Event Calendar

« »

December

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Most Viewed

  • Stay the course

    I am frustrated and angry with those who claim the only chance of future success is for the Democratic Party, especially in the South and Midwest, to abandon speaking directly to women and people of color and the LGBT community and instead focus on the economy and other "more comfortable" topics in order to win back some of the center.
  • Reality TV prez

    There is almost nothing real about "reality TV." All but the dullest viewers understand that the dramatic twists and turns on shows like "The Bachelor" or "Celebrity Apprentice" are scripted in advance. More or less like professional wrestling, Donald Trump's previous claim to fame.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: Reality TV prez

    • And while we're at it, Runner, the Wisconsin recount isn't finished yet, but as of…

    • on December 9, 2016
  • Re: Reality TV prez

    • In fact, Runner, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote by 2.7 million and counting, just…

    • on December 9, 2016
  • Re: Stay the course

    • Thank you Autumn. I agree that we can not compromise an inch on the value…

    • on December 9, 2016
 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation