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Five Arkansas artists you should know 

They all have stories to tell.

It's a fool's errand to put a limit on the number of artists whose work you'd urge people to dash out and see. Once you start naming names, someone will be left out, and that someone will be miffed. But who could possibly, in one story, write about every Arkansas artist who creates work of enduring quality? Especially in a newspaper.

So, for the sake of brevity and the cost of newsprint, I decided to limit myself to writing about five artists whose work, I believe, bears close attention. Why five? I don't know. Maybe I Saw the Figure 5 in Gold.

To narrow down the field I decided not to write about emerging artists — though one profiled here has not exhibited in Arkansas yet. They aren't laurel-headed either, like David Bailin or Anita Huffington or George Dombek or Warren Criswell or Robyn Horn. (Or Kevin Kresse or Aj Smith or Marjorie Williams-Smith or V.L. Cox or Evan Lindquist ... see how much trouble you can get into when you start to name names?) They are not sculptors, ceramicists or contemporary craftsmen. They are not photographers, though Arkansas has an abundance of terrific photographers. They aren't conceptual artists — I could have written about Rachel Trusty (her wonderful stuffed baby-faced chicks, for example) or Holly Laws (her dog-tag project) or John Salvest (a huge talent who deserves an entire book for his conceptual work), but didn't. Other Arkansas artists will have their day in the sunlight this paper beams, but it's not this day.

Instead, I have chosen five narrative artists. The South (and I'm not saying Arkansas is particularly Southern, but we share some characteristics of our neighbors east and south) has a strong storytelling tradition and the artists I write about here tell stories visually. It doesn't matter if the viewer can read the artist's mind; interpretation is welcome. One artist is a slight exception to the narrative theme, but his body of work, scenes of present day Little Rock, is creating a historical narrative that future generations will cherish. Let's start with him.

click to enlarge URBAN LANDSCAPE: John Kushmaul paints what he sees around him — downtown Little Rock. image
  • URBAN LANDSCAPE: John Kushmaul paints what he sees around him — downtown Little Rock.

John Kushmaul
Painter

John Kushmaul, 42, is well known to, he guesses, 2,000 people who live in and around Little Rock, those moving in the sphere of art and music. That's too small a number.

Kushmaul has had a studio over Vino's Brewpub for 16 years, where he turns out often large paintings of what he sees around him: buildings, bridges, the trolley, the River Market district. A fire escape. The skyline. The view of I-630 from Woodrow Street. Things we might consider banal. Thanks to his painterly style, his well-handled colors that may be scumbled here, saturated there, the paintings are not banal. Kushmaul's not a new kid on the block; he sells one to two paintings a month, he says, and is affiliated with several galleries. He has made a living on his paintings alone, but bookending that time he has worked in television, at KTHV, KARK and FOX 16, sometimes as a producer, sometimes as a weekend assignment editor. He works in TV now because he was "burned out on the crushing poverty" of making a living on art alone. His studio — a true garret encompassing two rooms and a hallway with bad ceilings and worn, ancient linoleum — is packed with paintings in various stages of completion. The black-eyed pea aroma of fermenting hops from Vino's below fills the rooms where Kushmaul is creating an urban narrative: Little Rock of the late 20th and early 21st century. Some structures he's painted no longer exist. He is the only painter I can think of who has painted a demonstration at a congressman's Little Rock office (Blanche Lincoln's).

click to enlarge John Kushmaul in his 7th Street studio above Vino's image
  • Brian Chilson
  • John Kushmaul in his 7th Street studio above Vino's

Kushmaul says creating a record is not what he's after. "I'm not trying to create the story of Little Rock in paint," he says. Nevertheless, he is painting pictures whose appeal to future generations will be more than aesthetic, in the way we enjoy not just the style of Impressionists but the beauty of their period in time.

Kushmaul's thoughts are as varied as the colors of his palette. He says he's a "little bit proud" of his work, and pleased that he's "built a nice little life for myself." But he professes insecurity and sometimes wonders if he is doing all he should be doing. He worries that he's poor at promoting his work (he posts few images of his paintings on Facebook and doesn't maintain a webpage). He is in, he says, "the midst of a great, wonderful failure." But, Kushmaul adds, "all of life is failure eventually." Yes, we'll all shuffle off the mortal coil, but Kushmaul's paintings will live on.

You can find his work at Gallery 26, the Butler Center Galleries and Stephano's Fine Art.

click to enlarge Delita Martin "The Dream Keeper" image
  • Delita Martin "The Dream Keeper"

Delita Martin
Printmaker

When Delita Martin was a child in Conroe, Texas, her grandmother lived with the family, taking care of Martin while her mother worked. While Texana Williams entertained Martin with stories, Martin cut out squares of quilting fabric for her grandmother.

Some of the stories were about a little girl named Luna who lived on the moon. The Luna tales would change with the phases of the moon. As Martin aged, she came to realize that her grandmother's stories were parables, a way of teaching her about life.

click to enlarge SHE CAME FROM WOMEN WHO COULD FLY: Delita Martin's career is taking flight image
  • Brian Chilson
  • SHE CAME FROM WOMEN WHO COULD FLY: Delita Martin's career is taking flight.

Martin, 41, pays tribute to her grandmother with her series "I Come From Women Who Could Fly," now on exhibit at the Arts and Science Center in Pine Bluff. The large works mix multiple layers of inked linoleum images; handmade silkscreened papers are sewn to the surface to represent clothing. (Her grandmother taught her the stitch she uses.) The resulting works are complex, beautiful drawings in vibrant color. The series took her a year to complete (and took over the dining room floor, where, absent a big enough press, she stood on the plates to print the works). The exhibition embodies the "magical realism that happened to me as a child. ... I've pieced together the stories like she [her grandmother] pieced together the quilts." And because the time spent with her grandmother was often at night, many of the works "have a blue, evening quality," the artist said.

One day after school when Martin was only 12, her father, a painter and carpenter, met her, packed up her drawings between two pieces of heavy paper — "a sad portfolio," she described it — and drove her to Texas Southern University in Houston to meet famed African-American muralist John Biggers, who founded Texas Southern's art department. "John Biggers gave me my first critique," Martin said, smiling. She was thrilled to see Biggers' images of African-American women. They were "wearing head scarves ... like crowns. It wasn't this mammy image," but dignified, and it was something she had not seen before, she said. Biggers was "very animated," praising her style and giving her advice she took to heart: "Do not ever miss an opportunity to uplift your people through your work."

You can find Martin's work at Boswell-Mourot Fine Art.

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