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From the web re 'The roots of Little Rock's segregated neighborhoods' 

From the web

In response to "The roots of Little Rock's segregated neighborhoods," July 10:

As a teacher in LR, I have noticed that our students segregate themselves across racial lines. It happens in the hallway, at lunch, and even in the classroom (the reason an integrated seating chart is necessary or there would be an imaginary racial line drawn down the center of the classroom). I don't think anything sinister is going on, but only the fact that people tend to naturally surround themselves with others like themselves. I also think it is important for these students to be encouraged to cross racial boundaries and work together.

Your article makes it sound like there is a conspiracy plot going on, when I think much of this just occurs naturally. Instead of finger-pointing, how about we spend our time and energy on getting people to naturally integrate and value others for our diversity?

FindX

I spent the first 25 years of my life being raised in Little Rock and only once do I recall a white stranger saying hello or good day to me (excluding folk at school of course). I have lived in N.Y. ever since and I am no longer treated that way (marginalized). In fact — instead of being the black this or that I am just simply Latonya. This is why I am tormented; should I go back home so my chocolate baby can grow up with family and friends or stay up here without family so as a brown person he can have better opportunities and higher self-esteem? It really is a no-brainer I guess but a terrible sacrifice just the same. I am certain that if I stayed in Arkansas I wouldn't be a manager reporting to the VP of Operations for one of the richest companies in NYC.

Latonya Brown

In response to an item on the Rock Candy blog on the few films being shown at the Ron Robinson Theater:

I have really had a difficult time with the theater. My understanding was that our tax dollars were going to support a space that could be used by the public. When I asked about that I was told it could only be used Monday-Wednesday if I wanted it in the evening. That pretty much cuts out any kind of public use. I was told it was being used to screen movies. Not many movies were on the calendar. Then, it took me nearly two months of back and forth email to just get a quote. I was then told that they weren't booking anything anymore. After questioning this, I was contacted by someone else, who was very helpful, but by then, it was really too late for the planned event. It certainly left me with a bad taste in my mouth. I hope that this can end up being a space that can be used by the public. It is a shame that it is sitting empty when people are ready and willing to use it for events.

PaulPrater

In response to a post on the Arkansas Blog about former Gov. Mike Huckabee's private jet travels and how he pays for them:

Oink! Oink! Oink! That this talentless hack can make himself rich shows how stupid Americans are these days. Bro. Huck is one of the most dishonest con men to come out of Arkansas. We yack yack yack about him but no one bothers to investigate his record and get him behind the steel bars where he belongs.  Continually escaping punishment for crimes committed creates monsters that we're forced to live with and sets a terrible example for our kids. Huck should have been nabbed when he was taking money under the table to spy on Hillary back when we were paying him to be our Lt. Gov.  His last year in office as our Gov., he committed outrages I didn't think anyone could get away with ... and yet danced off to be the Fox darling of the dumbest people in America. It would seem Huck escaped his sins thanks to professional courtesy offered by his fellow politicians on both sides of the aisle in Arkansas and ain't that a damn shame! Maybe because Huckabee is fat ... he's just too big to fail?

Deathbyinches

In response to an Arkansas blog post on Tom Cotton's lead in second-quarter fund-raising for his U.S. Senate race against Sen. Mark Pryor:

I don't know which is worse: out-of-state billionaires who think they can buy Arkansas on the cheap, or a supposed Arkansan like Tom Cotton who is willing to sell out his fellow Arkansans to these out-of-state billionaires. I guess I can't blame the billionaires as much as I do the sorry sapsucker who will betray his own people for the likes of the Koch brothers and Karl Rove. Cotton should be ashamed, but he is so cold and fishlike, he has no feeling or concern for real Arkansans. I could never vote for anyone like that, regardless of what party they are in. He is not one of us.

Poison Apple

I'll consider voting for Rotten Cotton just as soon as his new bride moves to Arkansas. Further proof he's not one of us!

RYD

In response to an Arkansas Blog post about headway being made in the South by Democratic politicians:

This is the 50th anniversary of Barry Goldwater's famous "extremism" speech to the Republican National Convention that brought the South into the Republican Party, thus changing that party from a party that espoused economic conservatism and social liberalism to one that espoused reactionary social views as well as economic conservatism. Even Barry Goldwater backed away from those views later, after he was defeated by Lyndon Johnson in what was the biggest margin ever up to that time. I remember that speech. The context then, of course, was Communism, aimed at bringing in the John Birchers, but the White Citizens Councils and other anti-civil rights groups in the South also took it as a rallying cry for resistance. It signaled the beginning of the Republican Party as we know it now. His opponent in the Republican primaries was Nelson Rockefeller, brother of Winthrop Rockefeller, who served as New York governor, and who was a very decent, respectable Northeastern Republican who would turn over in his grave if he knew what the Republican Party has now become. The Republican Party was civilized then. You remember Goldwater's words: "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice; moderation in the fight for freedom is no virtue."

plainjim

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