Going wet 

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Going wet

The era of "we will remain pure and in poverty" is over. The era of treating adults like children is over. The era of sacred wet ground vs. sacred dry ground is over. The grasp of the drive-in window Baptists controlling the world is over. We can shop 24-7 without blue laws except for liquor and beer and we should quit restricting booze on Sunday because it's a 19th century idea whose time is over. We can expect a lot less GOD in our government in the future and I thank Allah for that ... no actually I don't believe in Allah either... I'll just thank my lucky stars! I have seen our outdated liquor laws at work first hand and know they're so FK'ed up in order to deliver great wealth to the few while extracting larger amounts of money from our pockets. It's that way in all of our 50 states for the exact same reason. Time to scuttle all that with advanced apologies to the monopoly booze distributors who art in LR. Everyone in Pulaski County who wants to drink is already drinking. All 75 counties should be wet in order to enjoy the profit and advancement that comes with an equal playing field. Why force your population to dump their money in the next county over or in southern Missouri or Roland, Oklahoma or Tunica, Mississippi? Let us all share the wealth! I'll drink to that!

Death by inches

Public schools

While it is true that public schools have often failed to do their job in Arkansas, it is also true that the public has not worked to fix the problem. Charter schools are one more way to run away from seeking a solution. Hiring another consultant is also a ruse. White flight has benefited the counties around Pulaski, and that too is a dilemma. It is past time to face the music and address the basic causes.

Verla Sweere

The hospital merger

It is BEYOND clear that the Catholic Church values its religious dogma over human life. It's been repeatedly demonstrated in similar situations in Catholic-run hospitals wherever they operate. Its supposedly "pro-life" stance behind "religious freedom" is no more nor less than a smokescreen for anti-women-, anti-sex-, anti-reproductive-science and health care. The church will obfuscate and lie to hide these ugly facts. Cardinal Trujillo, deceased, is a hideous case in point: supporting the Catholic Church's anti-condom-distribution policy in Africa and falsely claiming that latex condoms are permeable to the HIV virus (they are not). Result? The former president of the Royal Society of Britain (oldest continuing scientific body on earth) stated that this Catholic anti-condom-distribution policy resulted in between 20 million to 60 million deaths in Africa from AIDS. These policies ... have nothing whatever to do with ethics, science or medical care. They are religious dogma, pure and simple. They must be shunned completely by any ethical health treatment facility. Management solutions, if needed, must be sought elsewhere. Because, again repeatedly, the Catholic church has demonstrated time and again that it will LIE to preserve its dogma. Yes, it's that clear and simple. And ugly.

Norma Bates

Thinking about beer

In response to David Koon's article about rare booze in the Oct. 24 issue.

As someone who grew up just a few miles to the Yuengling brewery (evidently America's oldest, or so they claim), I'm surprised to see it cited as coveted, but it certainly is rare in these parts. Their lager is the original and best, IMO. It's so prevalent anywhere in PA that if one walks into any bar in Philadelphia and simply requests a "lager," they are guaranteed to receive a Yuengling, typically in a longneck bottle ... . Great, now I'm craving a lager. Thanks.


Business hypocrisy

As has been noted before in these pages, too many employers are finding ways to avoid paying full wages or provide benefits. They are happy to allow government (in other words, all the rest of us) to subsidize their business acumen with food stamps, Medicaid, EITC and other humanitarian programs, but they are first in line to complain bitterly about government spending. It is galling to only be allowed to work one or two hours below the full-time schedule for years alongside full-time workers doing the same job who are getting full pay and benefits. The high unemployment rate has been a bonanza for employers, allowing them to tell employees to be grateful for what they have, while finding new ways to "get more for less" from their employees.


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