Graduation honors 

I went to a dinner for UALR contributors a few weeks ago and came away impressed by a public relations film that told the UALR story vividly through its students. They included a dead-end high school student who blossomed years later with UALR’s help and a middle-aged woman who works at a shelter for battered women who wants to be better equipped to help people in need. Several work their way through school, fitting classes around jobs and kids. They are on fire about education, in a mature, world-wise way. This brings me to Charlie Miller. UALR graduation is this Saturday. They don’t pass out honorary degrees at UALR. They honor students instead, students like Charles Miller Jr., 35, who took a mere 18 years to qualify for his degree in math and physics. He’s the first African-American to earn a physics degree at UALR. We can forgive Miller for his long slog to a bachelor’s degree. He graduated from Hall High School in 1987 and started UALR immediately. But he had to work for a living. And he married young. He and his wife Rulisa now have five children — Neiko, 19; Jason, 17; twins Charlie and Charity, 14, and Destiny, 11. They also provide care for two young relatives, an 18-month-old and a three-month-old. Working sometimes meant multiple jobs. Some years, he just couldn’t find time to enroll in a class. He sold Chevys. He worked in a factory making videocassettes. He worked in restaurants, finally becoming catering director at Cajun’s Wharf. He doesn’t think he could have done it anywhere but UALR. “Most of us are in the same situation,” Miller said. “We’re older, working at a full-time job. They really try to work around your schedule. It’s a much more serious atmosphere than where the younger kids are.” For years, Miller and his wife promised themselves that graduation would be a time to celebrate with a trip to Paris. But there are real-world complications. Miller is doing much of the work on restoration of a house in the Central High neighborhood. (You may have read in the paper about a surprise he found when he began this project — skeletal remains in the attic, a mystery still unsolved.) Miller hopes to have an important friend at graduation. He’s William Harris, who got Miller interested in science when he was Harris’ student at Metropolitan high school. “Without him, I’d have never gone to college,” Miller says. He thinks if more teachers put the enthusiastic emphasis on science that Harris did, more students, black and white, might get interested. Charlie Miller did and he became the first of six children in his family to complete a college education. Not that it’s completed. Though he might take a job teaching part-time at Pulaski Tech, Miller doesn’t think he has the qualifications to win a job with the kind of pay he wants. (He says it’s a pity to know what beginning science faculty members make at UALR.) When Miller first enrolled, he chose physics as a major because UALR didn’t offer engineering. It does now. He may push on for a master’s degree. “When I walk on that stage there will be a sense of accomplishment that it’s finally over. But, really, it’s not over. It’s just the end of one chapter and the beginning of another.”


Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Working Families group buys ads hitting French Hill on vote for bank protection

    Republican U.S. Rep. French Hill of Little Rock seems likely to cruise to re-election against largely unfunded opponents, including Libertarian Chris Hayes and Democrat Dianne Curry, but an independent group has entered the fray against Hill with ads  attacking the former banker's votes helpful to big banks.
    • Oct 26, 2016
  • Hester says state can afford $105 million income tax cut

    Sen. Bart Hester, a Republican from Cave Springs who's been endeavoring lately to end state support for the state-owned War Memorial Stadium among other attacks on government spending, distributed a news release today saying he was working on a proposed $105 million income tax cut.
    • Oct 26, 2016
  • Vote suppression efforts continue in U.S.

    This is one to watch in Arkansas. The New York Times reports on incidents nationwide in which Republican-controlled states where voter ID laws have been invalidated in courts have found other ways to make it hard for new voters to get access to the polls.
    • Oct 26, 2016
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • The education legislature

    Republican political control in Arkansas means many things: lots of gun bills, lots of anti-abortion bills, lots of efforts to make religious belief law, such as discrimination against gay people.
    • Mar 10, 2015
  • Supremely discredited

    Arkansas Supreme Court Justice Rhonda Wood and her allies continue to discredit the state's highest court.
    • Jul 30, 2015
  • Hutchinson pulls Faubus move

    I don't know what if anything might arise or be planned in the future relative to Gov. Asa Hutchinson's order to end Medicaid reimbursement for medical services (not abortion) provided by Planned Parenthood in Arkansas.
    • Aug 20, 2015

Most Shared

  • Welfare for the wealthy: More reasons to VOTE NO on ISSUE 3

    Voices on the left and right are lifted against Issue 3, the corporate welfare amendment to send tax money to private business and corporate lobbyists.
  • Little Rock police kill man downtown

    Little Rock police responding to a disturbance call near Eighth and Sherman Streets about 12:40 a.m. killed a man with a long gun, Police Chief Kenton Buckner said in an early morning meeting with reporters.
  • From the mind of Sol LeWitt: Crystal Bridges 'Loopy Doopy': A correction

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is installing Sol Lewitt's 70-foot eye-crosser "Wall Drawing 880: Loopy Doopy," waves of complementary orange and green, on the outside of the Twentieth Century Gallery bridge. You can glimpse painters working on it from Eleven, the museum's restaurant, museum spokeswoman Beth Bobbitt said

Latest in Max Brantley

  • Trumped in Arkansas

    After two solid debates and the release of a video and corroborating testimony that further confirmed the misogyny of Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton is favored to win the presidential election Nov. 8
    • Oct 20, 2016
  • So many provocations...

    Another bad week demands a Worst Of listing.
    • Oct 6, 2016
  • State university secrets

    Today's subject: lack of accountability at state universities.
    • Sep 29, 2016
  • More »

Visit Arkansas

Searching for diamonds at Crater of Diamonds State Park

Searching for diamonds at Crater of Diamonds State Park

A venture to this state park is on the must-do list for many, the park being the only spot in North America where you can dig for diamonds and other gemstones and keep your finds.

Event Calendar

« »


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: The big loser

    • Investigator, you are none of those things, but simply a serial ranter. At this you…

    • on October 26, 2016
  • Re: The big loser

    • If they really wanted to knockout the Clinton's, they would have done so with guilty…

    • on October 26, 2016
  • Re: Trumped in Arkansas

    • What a funny article, I hope sarcasm was your intent! First, since this was written…

    • on October 23, 2016

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation