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Hill Harper to UALR 

WEDNESDAY 2/15

HILL HARPER

7 p.m. UALR Donaghey Student Center. Free.

Hill Harper wears many hats: actor, author, scholar (Brown University, Harvard University and Harvard Law School), activist, speaker, entrepreneur, mentor. The Iowa native is probably best known for his portrayal of Dr. Sheldon Hawkes on the CBS procedural crime drama "CSI: NY," though his books — including "The Conversation: How Men and Women Can Build Loving, Trusting Relationships" and his latest, "The Wealth Cure: Putting Money in Its Place" — have earned Harper acclaim as well. He's currently on a speaking tour, "The HBCU Empower Me Tour" representing the Manifest Your Destiny Foundation, the nonprofit he founded to help young people succeed. RB

THURSDAY 2/16

SELF DEFENCE SISTEM

9:30 p.m. White Water Tavern. $5.

This is a kick-off event for the Little Rock Horror Picture Show, and after listening to a few tracks from Self Defence Sistem, that seems appropriate. The duo — DJs Cam Holifield and T.J. Deeter — make electronic music that flirts with the shimmering and blissful and dreamscape-y, but settles down long-term with the drone-y and glitch-y and dread-filled. Think Flying Lotus, Burial, Pantha Du Prince and the like, but a bit sparser sounding. Also performing will be Andy Warr and J.R. Top. Admission is free if you've got an LRHPS pass. RB

FRIDAY 2/17

LITTLE ROCK HORROR PICTURE SHOW

7 p.m. Market Street Cinema. $40 (full pass).

Well, another Valentine's Day has come and gone and most of us have somehow managed to survive it. What better way to recuperate from this Pyrrhic victory over the Romantic-Industrial Complex than with three days of blood-curdling terror from the darkest bowels of hell? Brought to you by the good folks from the Little Rock Film Festival, this horror mini-fest is another in a string of really cool developments in the local film scene, another of which is the monthly Argenta Film Series, which screens "The Wise Kids" at Argenta Community Theater at 7 p.m. Thursday night. The first offering in Little Rock Horror Film Show is "Madison County," an awesomely creepy horror/hixploitation flick set in the hills and hollers of Northwest Arkansas that'll ensure that you'll be ultra creeped out forever whenever you hear someone scream "woo pig sooie." The film, directed by Eric England and shot outside of Ozark, premiered at Screamfest L.A. back in October and was so popular it earned an encore screening. After the film, England and actor/producer Ace Marrero will participate in a Q&A with the Times' David Koon. Of course, there are plenty more thrills and chills and buzzed-about flicks from around the world, including "The Holding," "The Tunnel," "Exit Humanity" and more. Check the LRFF website for the full schedule. RB

FRIDAY 2/17

RODNEY BLOCK & THE REAL MUSIC LOVERS WITH 607

9 p.m. Twelve Modern Lounge. $10-$15.

This should be really good: one of the top jazz acts in Arkansas performing with one of the state's premiere MCs. It's been billed as "Jazz vs. Hip-Hop IV" and promises solo performances as well as collaboration. Rodney Block and Co. (Sam Carroll on keys, Michael Chandler on drums and Oliver "OT" Thomas on bass) play all the time, so you know they're sharp. The latest 607 album, "Yik3s!," got quite a bit of play around the Times offices, as did his absolutely raging remix of Azealia Banks' ubiquitous earworm "212." Promoter N'ell Jones expects to have several birthday celebrations going on, so expect good times and a celebratory vibe all around. RB

FRIDAY 2/17

SAMANTHA CRAIN, BRONCHO

9 p.m. White Water Tavern. $7.

This could be billed as "Oklahoma's Finest Take Over White Water Tavern," as these are two of the best acts I've heard out of the Sooner State in some time. Samantha Crain is no stranger to Little Rock, of course. The Shawnee native has played here on what seems to be an annual basis since 2007 or so, on stages ranging from perhaps the smallest (WWT) to the biggest (opening for the Avett Brothers at Robinson Center Music Hall). Crain's recent EP, "A Simple Jungle," is of a piece with her previous efforts. It might be a bit on the poppier side of things, but the songs are excellent and John Vanderslice's production is eclectic but never overbearing, showcasing her beautifully expressive voice. Broncho is on just about the opposite end of the dial. The band plays scrappy punk rock 'n' roll that sounds perfectly tossed-off and slack and effortlessly catchy. The group's 2011 album "Can't Get Past the Lips" sounds like every power-pop garage rock band you ever loved morphed into one, playing at the house party of your mind and all your friends are there — even the ones who died — and you're all drinking off the keg and having the best time ever. RB

FRIDAY 2/17

SCOTT KELLY, EUGENE S. ROBINSON

8:30 p.m. Downtown Music Hall. $10.

Here's the rare show at Downtown Music Hall that will not require earplugs or tufts of toilet paper jammed crudely into your ears. But make no mistake: it will be heavy, in that these headliners are major dudes in the worlds of heavy music, heavy writing and heavy beating the crap out of people. For the last quarter century or so, Scott Kelly has played with Neurosis, a band whose influence on metal is nearly incalculable. His acoustic solo albums "Spirit Bound Flesh" and "The Wake" drip with introspection and subtle dread, proving that screaming and distorted guitars and pounding drums aren't the only way to express one's deepest, darkest bad vibes. Eugene S. Robinson is a renaissance man — writer, publisher, musician, actor, fighter. Robinson fronts the pummeling art rock outfit Oxbow and has written for all kinds of publications, such as GQ, The Wire, Hustler and more. I first learned of Robinson via an article he wrote for Vice back in 2003 about how to give and receive an ass-whupping. He's also the author of "Fight: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Ass-Kicking but Were Afraid You'd Get Your Ass Kicked for Asking" and the novel "A Long Slow Screw." The local riff experts Iron Tongue open the show with an acoustic set. All in all, this is going to be a killer show that you probably ought not to miss. RB

SATURDAY 2/18

SUPERSUCKERS

9 p.m. Juanita's. $13 adv., $16 d.o.s.

The Supersuckers have been playing in the trash heap of rock 'n' roll since the late '80s, and precious few other acts have made it sound more fun. The band started in Arizona, but soon relocated to Seattle, where they must have stuck out like a sore middle finger in the early '90s grunge heyday. The Supersuckers unashamedly celebrated hedonism and excess (as opposed to the prevailing trend of introspective, concealed hedonism and excess). The band's Sub Pop debut "The Smoke of Hell" has aged exceptionally well, better than most of its peers. Toward the end of the album, there's a hat trick of tunes that just about sum up the 'Suckers MO: "Ron's Got the Cocaine," "Sweet 'n' Sour Jesus" and "Retarded Bill" clock in at a combined 3:30. But the group is no one-trick donkey — just check out 1997's "Must've Been High," which sounds like Johnny Thunders fronting The Buckaroos. More recent albums find the group mining classic rock with bitchin' results. The Spittin' Cobras and Joecephus & The George Jonestown Massacre open the show. RB

SUNDAY 2/19

YELAWOLF

8:30 p.m. Revolution. $20.

If videos on YouTube are any indication, Yelawolf is likely to be really good in concert. The self-proclaimed "white trash heartthrob," is wiry, usually shirtless (better to expose his giant screaming eagle-Heart of Dixie tattoo) and wears his hair in a sort of mullet Mohawk, which he thrashes around a lot. And he rhymes in this percussive flow that sounds like a snare drum and often comes so quick it's difficult to understand. The Gadsen, Ala., native raps about standard stuff — partying, cars, women — but often cleverer than most and often seasoned with a healthy dash of backwoods color. Meth and Mossy Oak shirts make regular appearances. It's like the Elmore Leonard-based TV show "Justified" — cartoonish, but still compelling and drawn from something real. Last year, the MC appeared memorably on Big Boi's solo record and released his latest album, "Radioactive," via Eminem's imprint, Shady Records. Kid Rock appears on the release's latest single. If Yelawolf is to break from the upper tier of the underground into the mainstream, now is the time. LM

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