"News just broke that Eric Cantor and Paul Ryan snuck off to the Koch brothers' infamous secret gathering of right-wing millionaires."

Some say snuck and some say sneaked, but either fits Cantor and Ryan. The two low-life Republican congressmen are the kind who look sneaky whatever they're doing. "Rep. Paul Ryan snuck off to church, where fellow parishioners kept a close eye on him." "Rep. Eric Cantor snuck off to the barber shop, and out without tipping."

Meeting with the Koch brothers requires an extra dash of sneakiness, even for Ryan and Cantor. What the Kochs and their cronies are up to is buying politicians and elections, so as to install a government that will never try to regulate their enterprises or levy taxes on them. For too long America has been focused on freedom and bravery, the Kochs and their kind believe; it's time for the land of the privileged and the home of the avaricious. (One of the Kochs' co-conspirators is Jackson Stephens Jr. of Little Rock, who inherited a ton of money and seems to resent those who didn't. Stephens invests large sums trying to defeat politicians who show sympathy for the middle and lower classes. His "Club for Growth" — or "Club for Greed," as fellow Republican Mike Huckabee calls it — is spending freely on television advertising against Sen. Mark Pryor, a moderate who occasionally votes with President Obama. One of the ads says, "Liberal Mark Pryor: He's got a lot to answer for." It's rumored that a later ad will say "President Barack Obama: He's still black.")

Many Arkansas legislators like to hobnob with rich right-wingers. Even a slow study can figure out that this could work to one's advantage. The infamous event that Cantor and Ryan attended was a conference of the American Legislative Exchange Council, a right-wing group funded by the Kochs and others that writes reactionary bills for docile legislatures to approve. ALEC is for privatization of schools, against labor, indifferent to air and water pollution. The legislation enacted in Arkansas and other states to discourage the poor, the elderly and minorities from voting is ALEC's work. A bunch of Arkansas lawmakers were scheduled to attend the same conference as Ryan and Cantor, and at taxpayers' expense. Virtually shameless, the Arkansans weren't particularly sneaky about their participation. These are legislators who don't worry about infamy. Or know how to spell it, in most cases.

The guilty senators were Cecile Bledsoe, Linda Chesterfield, Jane English, Bruce Holland, Jeremy Hutchinson, Johnny Key, Michael Lamoureux and Eddie Joe Williams. The representatives were Randy Alexander, Bob Ballinger, Nate Bell, Ken Bragg, Andy Davis, Jim Dotson, Charlene Fite, Douglas House, Andrea Lea, Mark Lowery, Micah Neal and Richard Womack. Know the enemy. You can be sure that the Kochs know their friends, and that they'll show it.


Speaking of Mark Pryor, Koch Brothers


Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Most Shared

  • Welfare for the wealthy: More reasons to VOTE NO on ISSUE 3

    Voices on the left and right are lifted against Issue 3, the corporate welfare amendment to send tax money to private business and corporate lobbyists.
  • Little Rock police kill man downtown

    Little Rock police responding to a disturbance call near Eighth and Sherman Streets about 12:40 a.m. killed a man with a long gun, Police Chief Kenton Buckner said in an early morning meeting with reporters.
  • From the mind of Sol LeWitt: Crystal Bridges 'Loopy Doopy': A correction

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is installing Sol Lewitt's 70-foot eye-crosser "Wall Drawing 880: Loopy Doopy," waves of complementary orange and green, on the outside of the Twentieth Century Gallery bridge. You can glimpse painters working on it from Eleven, the museum's restaurant, museum spokeswoman Beth Bobbitt said
  • Ted Suhl loses bid for new trial; faces stiff government sentence recommendation

    Ted Suhl, the former operator of residential and out-patient mental health services, has lost a second bid to get a new trial on his conviction for paying bribes to influence state Human Services Department policies. Set for sentencing Thursday, Suhl faces a government request for a sentence up to almost 20 years. He argues for no more than 33 months.
  • Football and foster kids

    It took a football stadium to lay bare Republican budget hypocrisy in Arkansas.

Latest in Editorials

  • The end of an era

    We're sad to report that Doug Smith has decided to retire. Though he's been listed as an associate editor on our masthead for the last 22 years, he has in fact been the conscience of the Arkansas Times. He has written all but a handful of our unsigned editorials since we introduced an opinion page in 1992.
    • May 8, 2014
  • A stand for equality

    Last week, Attorney General Dustin McDaniel became the first elected statewide official to express support for same-sex marriage. His announcement came days before Circuit Judge Chris Piazza is expected to rule on a challenge to the state's constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. Soon after, a federal challenge of the law is expected to move forward. McDaniel has pledged to "zealously" defend the Arkansas Constitution but said he wanted the public to know where he stood.
    • May 8, 2014
  • Same old, same old

    Remarking as we were on the dreariness of this year's election campaigns, we failed to pay sufficient tribute to the NRA, one of the most unsavory and, in its predictability, dullest of the biennial participants in the passing political parade.
    • May 1, 2014
  • More »

Visit Arkansas

Searching for diamonds at Crater of Diamonds State Park

Searching for diamonds at Crater of Diamonds State Park

A venture to this state park is on the must-do list for many, the park being the only spot in North America where you can dig for diamonds and other gemstones and keep your finds.

Event Calendar

« »


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

Most Viewed

  • Football and foster kids

    It took a football stadium to lay bare Republican budget hypocrisy in Arkansas.
  • The end is near

    Practically speaking, it doesn't really matter if Donald Trump accepts the results of the November election.
  • The politics of opportunity

    Are you sick of the election yet? One thing that seems certain is that our politics remain as hyperpartisan and dysfunctional as ever. I may be naive, but I think Arkansas has an opportunity to help lead the country back toward pragmatic progress on the issues that will make our families and communities stronger.

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: The big loser

    • Investigator, you are none of those things, but simply a serial ranter. At this you…

    • on October 26, 2016
  • Re: The big loser

    • If they really wanted to knockout the Clinton's, they would have done so with guilty…

    • on October 26, 2016
  • Re: Trumped in Arkansas

    • What a funny article, I hope sarcasm was your intent! First, since this was written…

    • on October 23, 2016

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation