Favorite

Is Tom Cotton looking ahead? 

Tom Cotton of Dardanelle, who came home from a Washington consulting job to run for 4th District Congress as a Republican, hasn't won his first election yet but people are already talking about higher office.

He's so impressed conservative bloggers that his name popped up last spring on conservative blogs as a potential candidate for U.S. Senate in 2014 against incumbent Democrat Mark Pryor. This was even before he'd won the Republican primary for the nomination. More recently, Republican politicos have been chattering about alleged Cotton positioning for the Senate race.

With big money, Cotton has emerged as a favorite in the 4th District and one of his opponents, Libertarian Party nominee Bobby Tullis, pulled out a time-honored political ploy last week, demanding that Cotton pledge not to seek higher office in 2014, but to keep working for the people he might be elected to serve this year. All politicians are ambitious, of course, but it's long been thought effective to accuse a candidate of using an office as a stepping-stone.

It took a few days, but the Times finally wrung a response out of Cotton spokesman Doug Coutts:

"You can quote Tom as follows: 'I don't have time to think about anything but working 24/7 to serve the people of the 4th Congressional District.'

"I can confirm that your reporting on NRSC contacts is incorrect. Neither Tom nor anyone acting on his behalf have had contact with the NRSC. Don't trust everything you hear in the LR echo chamber..."

Credit Cotton's campaign with a sense of humor. That "quote" from Cotton was the sentence crafted by our Arkansas Blog as a suggested response when it first announced Tullis' challenge.

Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Most Shared

  • Lawsuit filed over settlement in forum-shopping class action case

    The lawyers facing disciplinary action by federal Judge P.K. Holmes in Fort Smith over their settlement of a class action lawsuit against the USAA insurance company have a new legal headache.
  • A modest proposal for charter schools

    It was just a little over a year ago when Baker Kurrus was hired as the superintendent of the Little Rock School District. With new Education Commissioner Johnny Key there was a strong concern that the Little Rock school system would be converted to all charter schools and the entire public education system would disappear.
  • Highway Department: Key parts of new Clarendon bridge installed upside down.

    The future of the old Highway 79 bridge at Clarendon is uncertain, but it's a good thing the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department didn't jump the gun on demolishing it.That's because the new bridge at Clarendon — or at least the western approach, which is elevated over U.S. Fish and Wildlife wetlands — is snakebit.
  • Cherokee tribe backs the casino amendment

    NOW, I get it. The group circulating petitions for a constitutional amendment to establish casinos in Boone, Miller and Washington counties reveals that the deal anticipates operation of the casino in Washington County by the Cherokee tribe that now has casino operations in Oklahoma.
  • Coalition building

    In 1993 a group of Arkansas grassroots, religious and labor leaders got together to strategize how they could more effectively move positive reforms through our often resistant legislature. The leaders were frustrated that big business interests worked together to win favors and block reforms, while community and worker interests were isolated and often defeated.

Latest in The Insider

  • All in the family

    Old habits die hard. We may have a new Republican majority in the legislature, but like the old Democratic majority, it still doesn't hurt to have a lawmaker spouse to land a part-time job during the legislative session.
    • Jan 30, 2013
  • 'Circuit breaker' legal

    When we first asked Gov. Mike Beebe about the "circuit breaker" idea out of Arizona (automatically opting out of Medicaid expansion if the feds reduce the matching rates in the future), he said it was fine but noted that states can already opt out at any time, an assurance he got in writing from the feds.
    • Jan 30, 2013
  • Church goes to school in Conway

    An interesting controversy is brewing in Conway Public Schools, periodically a scene of discord as more liberal constituents object to the heavy dose of religion that powerful local churches have tried to inject into the schools, particularly in sex education short on science and long on abstinence.
    • Jan 23, 2013
  • More »

Event Calendar

« »

June

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30  

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation