It was a good week for Bible thumping by Mark Pryor 

It was a good week for...

BIBLE THUMPING. Sen. Mark Pryor talks about the Good Book in his latest commercial. "I'm not ashamed to say that I believe in God, and I believe in his Word," Pryor says in the ad, while holding a Bible. "The Bible teaches us no one has all the answers. Only God does. And neither political party is always right." In response, a tone-deaf Republican flack said Pryor was contradicting an earlier statement where he'd cautioned that the Bible isn't a "rule book for political issues." Both Pryor and opponent U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton's campaign condemned the flack's comments.

TOM COTTON. Another week, another fawning magazine profile of U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton. The latest was in National Journal, which described Cotton as "The Immaculate Candidate" on its cover and asked "Is Tom Cotton Too Good To Be True?" in its web headline. To answer that question, we point readers to the long and terrible record Cotton's amassed in just a short time in the House, including his opposition to the farm bill, his push for a government shutdown and his opposition to the Violence Against Women Act.

WEIRD WEATHER. A day after temps reached into the 70s over much of Arkansas, ice and snow fell, grinding pretty much all productivity to a halt for several days.

GUS MALZAHN. The Henderson State alum, ex-UA assistant and last year's head coach of Arkansas State, led his Auburn Tigers to a victory in the SEC Championship, which vaulted the team into the national championship game.

It was a bad week for...

REGGIE CORBETT. The embattled CEO of Little Rock Wastewater Utility was put on paid administrative leave by the Sanitary Sewer Committee after the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported that the utility paid nearly $12,000 to move a mobile home belonging to operations manager Stan Miller to one of the utility's treatment facilities, where he's been living rent-free for several weeks. The committee also put Miller on paid administrative leave. A further investigation by the committee is to follow.

PARROTHEADS. Jimmy Buffett fans were forced to eat their cheeseburgers in paradise at home. Ice forced the cancellation of Buffett's return visit to Verizon Arena.

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Most Recent Comments

  • Re: The Quapaw return to Arkansas

    • I'm the oldest son of the oldest son of the oldest son of the oldest…

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  • Re: The Quapaw return to Arkansas

    • That's what we need...another casino. Look how Tunica is tanking. I hope this doesn't happen.

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