Letters to the Editor, Nov. 8 

A better streetcar

Now that Little Rock's and North Little Rock's governments are beginning to talk seriously about extending a streetcar route to Adams Field, I hope they will consider getting the line up off the street and either eliminating or minimizing grade crossings. Of course it costs more to elevate a line and build bridges over streets, but it also means that the trolleys could travel up to 40 m.p.h. after leaving downtown Little Rock. Traveling at such a clip would make streetcars a valuable addition to our system of public transportation rather than the mere novelty that they are now. Otherwise, the ride from the airport into Little Rock would amount to just more snailing along behind cars and trucks. And we can do that already.

Bill Shepherd

Little Rock

Newspaper watch

How far has the Dem-Gaz fallen? A multiple choice question on Sunday news coverage Oct. 28:

a. news hole shrinkage?

b. bad journalistic judgment?

c. DemGaz becoming USA Today?

d. dumbing down of America?

e. All of the above?

Page 2B, no photo: “50 stage anti-war protest.”

Page 1B, 20-column-inch photo: “Sisters fall into muddy water at end of Mud Run.” For videos and more photos see www.arkansasonline.com.

Page 1B, 20 column inches with color photo: “Daughter awaits mom's hug.”

B Section is Arkansas. There are separate multi-page Style, High Profile and Sports sections

Robert Johnston

Little Rock

Indian heritage

In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed the first proclamation that declared November as National American Indian Heritage Month, to recognize and learn about the history and contributions of American Indians and Alaska Natives in education, art, literature, government, sports, science and technology past and present.

Presidents since then have continued the proclamation yearly. Arkansas was one of the few states that failed to recognize the importance of the American Indian and selected not to join the month-long recognition, even though the state receives its own name from the Quapaw. American Indians in Arkansas remained the most ignored and stereotyped minority group in the State.

Then, in 2006, Governor Huckabee aligned Arkansas with the rest of the nation when he also proclaimed November as Arkansas American Indian Heritage Month. This commendable action gave recognition to all American Indians living, working, or seeking a higher education within the State.

Now, in 2007, Governor Beebe has rejected the American Indians living in the state by refusing to make a similar proclamation for this November, turning back the clock. A spokeswoman for the governor claims that this rejection is because Arkansas already has an American Indian Heritage Week in the state codes. However, it should be noted that this act was based on similar earlier Federal resolutions which had been already outdated for over a decade when it was inexplicably passed in 2001. This outdated code did not prevent Governor Huckabee from making his proclamation. In contrast, Governor Beebe did not even proclaim Native American Week. Whatever Governor Beebe's reasoning is, the 18,000 or more American Indians living and working in Arkansas are apparently unimportant to the current administration.

The state's rejection of American Indians has adversely affected the ability for Arkansas organizations to collaborate and network with other organizations nationwide in developing programs and assisting one another in developing programs that can be shared throughout the month of November to recognize Native American contributions to the development and history of the U.S. and Arkansas.

David Lowe

American Indian
Heritage Support Center


Plug in

With oil topping $92 per barrel, now is a good time to remind everyone about technology already developed we can use TODAY to decrease our oil usage/dependency and help the environment: electric cars, or plug-in hybrids. If you haven't read Sherry Borschert's “Plug-in Hybrids,” or seen “Who Killed the Electric Car?” then now is a good time to do so.

Educate yourself and discover how the corporate automakers and oil companies are lying to citizens about available electric car technology. Visit www.pluginamerica.com for more information. Do you care about national security? Support Set America Free, www.setamericafree.org. Contact your local, county, state and federal elected officials and urge them to create incentives and laws to bring plug-in electric cars to market and keep them here. Call your favorite car dealership and tell them you won't buy another car unless it has an electric plug.

Don't believe the lie that plug-in cars will create more pollution by using energy off our current electric grid. This is calculated misinformation. When asked to show proof, automakers can't do so. Lastly, beware of auto industries, corn and soybean lobbies who are pouring money into flex-fuel or hydrogen cell promotion. They are simply trying to divert our attention, as well as bend the ear of our country's leadership, thereby keeping from us electric vehicle technology already existing.

Julie Hendrix

Little Rock


Legalizing lottery in order to finance a better education for the people — what a joke! The lust of gambling (something for nothing) takes over where there should be the principle of earning and learning.

What kind of future is that? Surely our civilization has reached a higher degree of thought than should be determined by games of chance.

Katherine Erwin

Little Rock

Webster's definition of a hypocrite — “a person who puts on a false appearance of virtue or religion.”

Gambling in Arkansas: As long as I recall at 69 years old, Oaklawn horse racing in Hot Springs has been there. Is it not true that betting on horse racing is gambling? Why do the so-called Christians wet their britches regarding the lottery and bingo? It does not make sense.

A song I learned in church growing up in Arkansas said Jesus loves all the children of the world. So why did the Central High crisis happen if the Christians truly believed what they said they believed. Think about it.

Beverly A. Clary

Little Rock

The time is now

The time has come to declare that Newt Gingrich is a public nuisance.

Frank Lambright

Little Rock



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