Mountain jam 


3:30 p.m., Mulberry Mountain (outside of Ozark). $59-$129.


The crowds shouldn't reach Wakarusa heights, but look for at least several thousand — certainly what the folks in Ozark would consider the hordes — to come streaming in from all across the region for music, camping and general outdoor revelry. Jam fans might disagree, but to these ears, the Harvest Music Fest line-up compares pretty favorably to what Wakarusa brought back in June. To wit, country-rock pioneers the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band share the headlining spot with widely beloved modern folk act the Avett Brothers on Friday. Swing-era revivalists the Squirrel Nut Zippers play two two-hour sets throughout the weekend, and just as the Hackensaw Boys, a zany, tradition-minded eight-piece, finishes its set on Saturday, Springfield, Mo.'s Ozark Mountain Daredevils serves up classic country-rock songs you know like “Jackie Blue.” Also, jam fans are bound to be chomping at the bit to hear big name acts like Umphrey's McGee and Railroad Earth. On Wednesday and Thursday, the names are slightly smaller (the main stage doesn't open until Friday), but there are still a lot of worthy acts. Pay special attention, on Thursday, to the Travelin' McCourys and the Lee Boys. The former is an offshoot of the legendary Del McCoury bluegrass band and the later, you know from a previous To-Do, is a preeminent sacred steel band. In the ultimate jam-fan wet dream, they're performing together! For a complete line-up and schedule, go to mulberrymountainmusic.com.



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