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Pray for CATA 

Pray for CATA

It's an interesting issue of atheists advertising on the bus. I agree that they have the right to do it, but I don't think that vandalism is the real issue there. I've ridden the bus enough to have a feel for the ridership. What I think that CATA is trying to avoid is a general boycott of the bus system, by a large portion of its ridership. If this issue isn't resolved soon, it could be attracting national attention.

Gordon Fisher

Little Rock

Should've been there

That The Observer on June 1 waxes rhapsodic over, heaven forbid, "those long, skinny popsicles in plastic sleeves" is prima facie evidence that this outfit remains one of the usual prime suspects. I would hope the rest of the world is glad to join me in the idea that such packaging is the work of the devil, and the elongated thing inside is not enough to wet your whistle.

In the old days, popsicles were a double deal of plenty of ounces of frozen on what else but a pair of popsicle sticks and wrapped in biodegradable paper — a twofer easily parted down the middle for sharing's sake. Along with a Barq's Root Beer or cream soda in a sizable longneck returnable glass bottle later in the day, and not to forget fans, and you could make it through summer. Y'all should have been there. You would have learned plenty.

Bill Steinkamp

Hot Springs

Legal notices

in newspapers

This letter is about how newspapers might stop carrying legal notices.

One reason for the decline of the newspaper industry is that newspapers sell advertising, but aren't very good at advertising themselves.

If you read a sales circular, they display the product and the price. If you ask a newspaper company the cost of running an ad, they can't tell you over the phone.

I used to work at a carpet store. If a customer asked how much it cost to carpet their house, I would tell them "between $2 and $5 a square foot." Yes some carpet costs more and we would be glad to sell it to them.

Back to the topic of legal notices. I agree the city feels gouged because the legal notice section is kind of a monopoly.

I disagree with the argument that 81 percent of people read the whole paper. I read the headlines, a few stories and the funnies.

In closing, I say to the newspapers of America, if you want to increase advertising revenue, be a good salesman and tell the customer how much it costs to advertise. If you can't tell them the price, they think something's fishy and will go somewhere else.

David E. Dinwiddie

Pine Bluff

Boozman's

no conservative

I oppose Senator John Boozman's Parental Notification and Intervention Act, not on moral grounds, but on grounds of the constitutional principle of federalism.

According to this bill, the federal government presumes to know better how to care for the citizens of each state than the states do. It further presumes a sense of moral superiority on the part of the author over everybody else in the nation.

Essentially, this bill denies the state of Arkansas the right to determine its own policies in this matter.

Senator Boozman may be a Republican, but he's certainly no conservative.

Brad Bailey

Fayetteville

What's important

Again Arkansas shows where its priorities are: two lottery employees get raises of 20 percent and 8 percent. I have worked for UAMS for almost 23 years, and I have not had a raise for the last 2 years. We were just recently told that we would not get a raise this year either.

Football, basketball and the lottery ... says a lot about what we think is important.

Jo Ann Biedermann

Little Rock

He begs a question

Clint Miller has no argument with me. Of course, "to beg the question" is a logical fallacy. Rather than get pedantic, I wrote that it is a way of avoiding the question a particular way. A modern equivalent of the Latin petitio principii, "to beg the question" occurs when a person assumes the correctness of a premise he/she seemingly wants to demonstrate. For example, "Dogs should not be allowed to run loose because attacks on children will increase" assumes that dogs are attacking children when allowed to run loose. It avoids offering proof of its major premise. Mr. Miller's supposed refutation of my assertion is an example of a straw man argument, equally fallacious.

Stuart Jay Silverman

Hot Springs

From the web

Referencing "Would they be chagrined, these 19th-century Southern warriors, to find the fatherland today overrun with Yankees?" from Doug Smith's June 8 cover story "Is Bentonville the new Fayetteville?"

NW Arkansas was a hot bed of strong Unionism during the Civil War. Isaac Murphy and others let this be known when secession was rampantly pursued by the agricultural Delta and southern Arkansas political power brokers of the time. During the War, "Booger County," (better known today as Madison County) was a beehive of Unionist activity.

Cato

"Is Bentonville the new Fayetteville?" Nope. Fayetteville is a perfect example of a college town, and it's in a wet county. It's a (fairly) liberal city. There are interesting things to do.

Bentonville is a perfect example of a company town, is in a dry county, is quite conservative, and there ain't nothing interesting going on. I'm glad it's there, Walmart is a jobs machine for the area and XNA Airport is much better than FYV (though XNA is at least as overpriced as FYV was).

aerotive

This article is immersed in liberal innuendo and in some cases ignorance. Northwest Arkansas is successful because of individual effort and the lack of government interference, not because of the writer's term, "Yankees from the North." The writer's obvious affection for Democrats and praise for their inability to understand economic principles accentuates his own bias. An article honoring accomplishments rather than baiting the reader with negative tones would have served a greater purpose.

Freedom_2011

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