Favorite

School choice 

"Nobody can question my commitment to public education." That's what Gov. Mike Huckabee said when he vetoed legislation that would have barred public bond financing for private schools, such as Pulaski Academy. Huckabee's own children have attended public schools. He opposed ruinous proposals to destroy the property tax. It's also true that he hasn't moved forcefully enough to suit school voucher proponents. But public school advocates still have doubts, with some reason. He quietly opposed some school improvement legislation. He's insulted the Arkansas Education Association. He vetoed the private school bond ban, in keeping with the interests of his chief fund-raiser and his campaign manager, both patrons of Pulaski Academy. Then there's the lingering matter of the governor's very first appointment to the state Board of Education -- JoNell Caldwell of Bryant. She has three children -- 10, 17 and 20 -- none of whom has been educated in an Arkansas public school, unless you count the University of Arkansas. They've been home schooled or schooled in upper grades at private Pulaski Academy (her husband, a college roommate of the governor, is the campaign manager mentioned earlier.) Caldwell's term on the Board is about to end. Public school advocates think she shouldn't be reappointed. She says she doesn't know the governor's plans, but says she'd be happy to continue to serve. Caldwell defends herself with gusto. "I am very pro-education," she says. "I get real defensive when people put down public education." Caldwell had a public school education in Little Rock. Her mother, Little Rock elementary school teacher Jimmie Nell Johnson, was the Arkansas Teacher of the Year in 1969. From the beginning, though, Caldwell has schooled her own children at home. The number of home schoolers was much smaller when she started. People who made that choice were often viewed with suspicion; home school support networks hadn't grown to today's extent. "It was just a real personal choice," she says now. "It was a decision I made with my husband. But I'm definitely not opposed at all to putting children in public education." Caldwell says she encountered hostility to home schooling when she inquired about the public school enrollment for one child (not in the Little Rock district). That encounter played a role in limiting her search for secondary schools, when the time came, to private schools. Some public school advocates simply can't see past a school director who rejected public schools without ever trying them. Caldwell simply insists no inferences about public schools should be drawn from her personal decisions. "I've always looked at all my options and looked at the individual child. This is what I want for all education. I want every avenue we have to be the best. I want everybody to be proud of the public schools." It's that wish, she says, that motivates her desire to continue serving. You have to like her odds.
Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Hutchinson pulls Faubus move

    I don't know what if anything might arise or be planned in the future relative to Gov. Asa Hutchinson's order to end Medicaid reimbursement for medical services (not abortion) provided by Planned Parenthood in Arkansas.
    • Aug 20, 2015
  • Neighborliness, in Little Rock and beyond

    I had a parochial topic in mind this week — a surprise plan by Mayor Mark Stodola to address the Arkansas Arts Center's many needs.
    • Nov 19, 2015
  • Bootstraps for me, not thee

    Mean spirit, hypocrisy and misinformation abound among the rump minority threatening to wreck state government rather than allow passage of the state Medicaid appropriation if it continues to include the Obamacare-funded expansion of health insurance coverage for working poor.
    • Apr 14, 2016

Most Shared

Latest in Max Brantley

  • Don't cry for Robert E. Lee

    Congratulations are in order for Governor Hutchinson. He decided this year to devote the weight of his office to end the state's embarrassing dual holiday for slavery defender Robert E. Lee and civil rights hero Martin Luther King Jr.
    • Mar 23, 2017
  • City Board discovers LRSD

    An article in Sunday's Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reminded me of John Belushi in "Animal House" exhorting frat brothers to rally against a dean's effort to put them out of business. "Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?"
    • Mar 16, 2017
  • Supremely disappointing

    The Arkansas Supreme Court last week delivered a blow to civil rights in Arkansas. It was another results-oriented decision that gives a clue to how far the justices likely will go to appease the legislature.
    • Mar 2, 2017
  • More »

Visit Arkansas

Forest bathing is the Next Big Thing

Forest bathing is the Next Big Thing

Arkansas is the perfect place to try out this new health trend. Read all about the what, why, where and how here.

Event Calendar

« »

March

S M T W T F S
  1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31  

Most Recent Comments

  • Re: More on pits

    • Wait, children aren't just Scooby Snacks? I suggest we not limit our freedoms to what…

    • on March 27, 2017
  • Re: More on pits

    • Yes, here are many "people who shouldn't be allowed near a dog." Fine. But that…

    • on March 26, 2017
  • Re: More on pits

    • "the breed's propensity for unprovoked and deadly attacks on animals and people" This is nonsense…

    • on March 26, 2017
 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation