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Many of Arkansas's best public and private schools are located in Pulaski County, as the accomplishments of its students show. In fall 2010, it was announced that 17 LRSD students were named 2011 National Merit Semifinalists. Fifteen were from Central High, and two were from Parkview Arts and Science Magnet High.

Higher education degrees of all sort, in liberal arts, technical, medical and business fields, are also available in Pulaski County.

Colleges and universities

The University of Arkansas system has four campuses in Little Rock for undergraduate and graduate education. Pulaski Technical College now has seven in the area. There are two historically black private colleges and a number of career colleges. With some homework, students can find the right one.

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock: Now in its 42nd year as a four-year public university, UALR has more than 13,000 full- and part-time students.

Long a magnet for "non-traditional" students, this liberal arts school offers the only comprehensive information science and systems engineering degree in Arkansas and one of only 15 master's degrees programs nationwide in orientation and mobility, teaching the vision-impaired how to get around independently. With the opening of the new Donaghey College of Engineering and Information Technology (EIT) Building, UALR students and professors have a new, world-class facility to help them excel in both. UALR is also expanding its on-campus housing for honors students.

UALR's Bowen School of Law: The school, which has an enrollment of 440 students, has a 15 to 1 ratio of students to professors, one of the lowest of any law school. In addition to traditional law classes, students must take two "lawyering classes" in their second year.

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences: The state's medical school trains nurses, physicians, paramedics, pharmacists and other health professionals in its five colleges and graduate programs. UAMS opened a Psychiatric Research Institute in November 2008 and a new state-of-the-art Medical Center, which has added 540,000 square feet of hospital space, in January 2009.

The Clinton School of Public Service: The UA offers the only master's degree in public service in the nation at the Clinton School, on the grounds of the Clinton Library. Its impressive speaker series of nationally and internationally prominent lecturers brings the public to campus on an almost daily basis. The school has grown from 16 inaugural students in 2005 to more than 70 Master of Public Service degree candidates in the 2010-11 academic year.

Pulaski Technical College: The state's largest and fastest-growing two-year institution counts more than 11,000 students on its roster. The school offers more than 80 degree and certificate programs at its main campus in North Little Rock and at satellite locations in Pulaski and Saline counties. The school also provides specialized training for area business and industry.

Philander Smith College: Philander was founded in 1877 to educate former slaves. Its hugely popular "Bless the Mic" lecture series has brought to Little Rock leading national social and political figures. It is affiliated with the United Methodist Church and is the only school in Arkansas that is a member of the United Negro College Fund.

Arkansas Baptist College: Arkansas Baptist, which is affiliated with the Arkansas Baptist Consolidated Convention, offers both bachelor's and associate's degrees. It launched the Literacy Writing Initiative in 2007 and added a football program in 2007 that drew several hundred new students.

Private technical/career colleges locally include ITT Technical Institute, Remington College and the Eastern College of Health Vocations.

Public schools

Pulaski County has three public school districts, including the state's two largest, the Little Rock School District and the Pulaski County Special School District. The Arkansas River divides the Little Rock district and the North Little Rock School District, with the Pulaski County district forming a kind of donut around them.



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