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Art, music, dance and more.

THROUGH 12/24

DAVID MUDRINICH, 'CONNECTING WITH THE LAND'
Cantrell Gallery

David Mudrinich, a talented artist so shy his only online touts are his Arkansas Tech University faculty page and his Arkansas Arts Council page, is exhibiting drawings and paintings in his first Cantrell Gallery solo show. Mudrinich, who's shown work locally at Arkansas Capital Corp. Group's office gallery in the River Market district, is known for his fine lines and love of beehives as subject matter. In the Cantrell exhibition, he'll show his series on apiaries he's found in abandoned places, which he says show a "regeneration of purpose in what was once an active place." The show, the notice of which went astray in our Google mail, opened last week. After the New Year, the gallery will move its operation into the single storefront at 8208 Cantrell Road; the owners will announce details of a sale soon. LNP

click to enlarge PULLED AND PRESSED: Vito Acconci's "3 Flags for 1 space and 6 regions," in the Fort Smith Regional Arts Center's exhibition of mid-century American printmaking.
  • PULLED AND PRESSED: Vito Acconci's "3 Flags for 1 space and 6 regions," in the Fort Smith Regional Arts Center's exhibition of mid-century American printmaking.

THURSDAY 11/10-SUNDAY 11/13

'BUYER & CELLAR'
7:30 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun. The Studio Theater. $15-$20.

You know those antique-and-craft meccas where they make the whole thing seem like a little village, with quaint, curtained shop windows in cream and country blue? Well, Barbra Streisand has one of those in the basement of the barn at her coastal home in Malibu, photographed in great detail in her coffee-table book "My Passion for Design." The underground menagerie of French chaise lounges, vintage custom shoes and porcelain dolls sparked playwright Jonathan Tolins' imagination, so he decided to write a one-man play about an out-of-work actor who finds himself as the only employee in Babs' personal antique mall. Little Rock actor William Moon stars as Alex More and plays several other roles, too, in what he calls "the most unconventional rehearsal process I have had to date. ... Having to memorize nearly two hours' worth of dialogue verbatim is a challenge in and of itself, but having to play six different characters that interact with each other adds another challenge to the mix. With most shows, most of the work is done at the theater, but this is the first show where I can honestly say I have spent more time with it at home. It's been a thrilling and somewhat surreal experience getting these characters on their feet after having spent so much time with them on my own." According to Moon, the play works for Streisand devotees as well as for those of us whose ability to recite the lyrics of "You Don't Bring Me Flowers" extends no further than the song's title. "To quote Alex More, the character I play in 'Buyer & Cellar,' " Moon says, " 'When I started this job, I was not that big a Barbra queen,' but I've certainly learned a lot about her since. Even though the play centers on Barbra, Alex takes the audience on a journey through the eyes of someone who has little knowledge of her beforehand, and by the end practically becomes obsessed with her." There are no assigned seats for this show, and the adjacent Lobby Bar will be open before and after the show, and during intermission. SS

FRIDAY 11/11

'PULLED, PRESSED AND SCREENED: IMPORTANT AMERICAN PRINTS'
Fort Smith Regional Art Museum
Reception 5 p.m., $5 nonmembers

The RAM opens an exhibition of 51 American prints by such masters as Milton Avery, Robert Motherwell, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Richard Estes in this survey of mid-century and later abstract, political and Pop printmaking. The exhibition, on loan from Syracuse University Art Galleries, which has an extensive collection that surveys the history of printmaking, runs through Jan. 5. Also on exhibit at the RAM: a 20-year overview of paintings by Fort Smith artist Jason Sacran, who has won numerous awards for his figurative and plein air work. LNP

click to enlarge 'WOUNDERBREAD KIDS': Stitched and drawn work by Kimberly Kwee at the Historic Arkansas Museum.
  • 'WOUNDERBREAD KIDS': Stitched and drawn work by Kimberly Kwee at the Historic Arkansas Museum.

FRIDAY 11/11

2ND FRIDAY ART NIGHT
5-8 p.m. Various venues downtown.

Diversity is the name of the game for November's downtown gallery walk: Wood-fired ceramics; drawings that include fabrics; paintings; quilts; mariachi music ... find them all at the participating venues. Among the offerings: Kimberly Kwee (drawings incorporating thread and fabric) and David Scott Smith (offbeat ceramic sculptures) at the Historic Arkansas Museum; "B Sides at the ACCG," drawings by Robert Bean and sculpture by Michael Warwick, at Arkansas Capital Corp.; "Chronicas de lo Efimero," paintings by Maria Botti Villegas, at the Cox Creative Center; "Landscapes/Dreamscapes," work by Jeanie Lockeby Hursley and Dominique Simmons, at McLeod Fine Art; and "Little Golden Books," "Fired Up: Arkansas Wood-Fired Ceramics," and the Studio Art Quilt Association in the Butler Center Galleries. Mariachi America will perform at the Old State House, where Stone's Throw craft beer will be served, and Nick Devlin and Brian Nahlen will perform at HAM. Bella Vita, Udelko Mobile Clothing Boutique and Loblolly Hot Chocolate Bar join the fun this month at the Lafayette Building. LNP

click to enlarge DANCING EARTH: The indigenous people's ensemble will perform Nov. 12 at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in conjunction with the museum's "The Art of American Dance."
  • DANCING EARTH: The indigenous people's ensemble will perform Nov. 12 at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in conjunction with the museum's "The Art of American Dance."

THURSDAY 11/10- SATURDAY 11/12

THOMAS DEFRANTZ, SLIPPAGE, DANCING EARTH
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville
Various events

"The Art of American Dance," an exhibition organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts, features 90 works by artists ranging from portrait artist John Singer Sargent to music-making costume artist Nick Cave. In conjunction with the exhibition, Crystal Bridges is bringing in Thomas DeFrantz, a Duke University professor of dance and African and African-American Studies, and a dancer from DeFrantz's interdisciplinary dance and technology collective Slippage to give a gallery talk on art and contemporary dance at 1 p.m. Thursday. That will be followed at 8 p.m. Friday — the museum's fifth anniversary — with an interactive SLIPPAGE performance, "FastDANCEPast," inspired by work in the exhibition and using green-screen technology. DeFrantz will also talk about dance history references in the performance. At 6:30 p.m., before the performance, the museum's "artinfusion" members will be able to dance with DeFrantz and SLIPPAGE performers. All three DeFrantz events are free. At 1 p.m. Saturday, Rulan Tangen and the Bay Area indigenous people's dance ensemble Dancing Earth will talk about works in the museum's permanent collection that focus on dance, culture and the environment, and at 8 p.m., Dancing Earth, SLIPPAGE, Tulsa Modern Movement and Alice Bloch will dance at the evening's Art Night Out party celebrating the museum's anniversary ($20). LNP

SATURDAY 11/12

FARM IN THE CITY
10 a.m. Mosaic Templars Cultural Center. Free.

The words "colony collapse disorder" tend to elicit furrowed brows from agriculturalists and beekeepers, and probably from any civilian who understands the degree to which our food supply depends on the specific work bee colonies do to pollinate plants that we eat: cucumbers, apples, squash, pumpkins — the list goes on and on. To help children better understand the work by bees and people alike that goes into keeping the grocery store shelves full, the Mosaic Templars Cultural Center hosts "Farm in the City" in collaboration with University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service, Arkansas 4-H and the Little Rock Zoo. The program highlights the contributions of African-Americans to Arkansas farming — including a local beekeeper — and lets participants interact with "animal ambassadors" from the Little Rock Zoo's Arkansas Heritage Farm, a program launched earlier this year that features wild turkeys, Blackberry sheep and a dwarf miniature horse. (Petting is encouraged.) Arkansas 4-H holds classroom activities inside the museum, and speakers from the cooperative extension service will present programming specific to farming in Arkansas. Do your best to forget that scene in "My Girl" and come check this out. SS

click to enlarge TRIPLE ROW SOUND: Dikki Du (Troy Carrier), a third-generation zydeco accordionist, brings his five-piece troupe to White Water Tavern 9:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 11, $7.
  • TRIPLE ROW SOUND: Dikki Du (Troy Carrier), a third-generation zydeco accordionist, brings his five-piece troupe to White Water Tavern 9:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 11, $7.

FRIDAY 11/11

DIKKI DU AND THE ZYDECO KREWE
9:30 p.m. White Water Tavern. $7.

There's a supermoon on the rise, the Chicago Cubs won the World Series and Little Rock gets two certified zydeco throwdowns in the same week. Just a few days before a show from Marcella Simien (daughter of the Grammy-winning zydeco player Terrance Simien), third-generation zydeco musician Dikki Du (Troy Carrier) comes through with his Krewe, a five-piece troupe with washboard and squeezebox. Troy's the son of Roy Carrier (yet another Grammy-award winning zydeco player), and learned to play washboard in his father's club in Lawtell, La., the Offshore Lounge, which took its name from the offshore drilling work that Roy did to support his family, eventually earning enough surplus to buy the club. After learning the ropes there, Dikki took off on tour with C.J. Chenier (the son of — you'll never guess — another Grammy-winning zydeco player) and played drums on tour with his brother Chubby Carrier through the '90s. Apparently not the type to rest on his family laurels, Dikki went on zydeco sabbatical and taught himself how to play the triple-row accordion, as he says on his website. "The big dream was to have your own zydeco band. Years ago, I said, 'Hell, I'm not gonna have a band, I don't even know how to play accordion.' ... I just stayed in a room and played the accordion for a whole year. I just went away from music because I really wanted it, but it took a whole year to learn it." That was over a dozen years ago; it's probably safe to say Dikki's found his Du. SS

SATURDAY 11/12

22nd ANNUAL HOLIDAY SHOW AND SALE
Reception 7-10 p.m. Gallery 26.

Yes, the Halloween pumpkin has barely begun to rot and it's time to shop for Christmas. An annual stop for art lovers is Gallery 26's annual artspalooza, which features paintings, jewelry, pottery, photographs and handmade ornaments by more than 50 Arkansas artists. There will be live music at the opening; the show runs through Jan. 14. LNP

SATURDAY 11/12

'DIA DE LOS MUERTOS'
Reception 6-8 p.m. William F. Laman Public Library, NLR.

The Latino Art Project, formed to showcase the history of Latino culture through art exhibitions and outreach in Central Arkansas, will present a Day of the Dead show at the main branch of the Laman Library. The Latin American "Dia de los Muertos" holiday is part of an ancient tradition in which people honor their deceased ancestors with visits to graves, graveside feasts and the construction of altars. The exhibition will include work inspired by the tradition by Luis Atilano, Lery Atilano, Anthony Samuel Lopez, Luis Saldaña, Maricela Aviña, Klint Williams, Michelle Pierson, Oliveri Perez and Sabrina Zarco. The show runs through Jan. 6. LNP

SUNDAY 11/13

ARKANSAS SYMPHONY YOUTH ORCHESTRA FALL CONCERT
3 p.m. Albert Pike Masonic Center. $10-$20.

That Greek-column-lined gargantuan you drive past on Scott Street between Seventh and Eighth streets is the Albert Pike Masonic Center, dedicated in 1924 and co-designed by George Mann, the architect for the Arlington Hotel and the state Capitol. Up until 2014, it was pretty much hermetically sealed to the public eye, so performances in the space since then have been tinged with an extra bit of excitement — the feeling of decades of secrecy unfurled. This Sunday, the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra's auditioned youth ensemble plays a fall concert in the monolith's magnificent theater with a "greatest hits" sort of program that seems perfectly engineered to cement the young players' affinity for orchestral music: Barber's "Adagio for Strings," the lively March movement from Prokofiev's "The Love for Three Oranges" and "Poem for Orchestra" by Arkansas's own William Grant Still. A trio of dancers from Ballet Arkansas will join the orchestra for Debussy's orchestration of Satie's "Trois Gymnopedies"— a set of three pieces for solo piano that have made appearances in a Lana Del Rey song and too many films to count — and a larger group of Ballet Arkansas artists interpret Ravel's "Bolero," originally commissioned as a ballet. If you've got a young one in the house who might be inspired by hearing people her own age playing works whose beauty has earned them a home in concert halls for eons, take her along. SS

click to enlarge ADRIFT ON THE OREGON TRAIL: Fed up with inaction from the men in charge, Emily Tetherow (Michelle Williams) leverages a flintlock rifle for the sake of the group's survival in Kelly Reichardt's "Meek's Cutoff," Film Quotes Film's November pick for the Arkansas Times Film Series, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, Riverdale 10 Cinema, $8.
  • ADRIFT ON THE OREGON TRAIL: Fed up with inaction from the men in charge, Emily Tetherow (Michelle Williams) leverages a flintlock rifle for the sake of the group's survival in Kelly Reichardt's "Meek's Cutoff," Film Quotes Film's November pick for the Arkansas Times Film Series, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, Riverdale 10 Cinema, $8.

TUESDAY 11/15

ARKANSAS TIMES FILM SERIES PRESENTS: 'MEEK'S CUTOFF'
7 p.m. Riverdale 10 Cinema. $8.

Kelly Reichardt's "Meek's Cutoff" (2010) is shot in what is known as the Academy ratio, a now nearly obsolete aspect ratio that had its heyday from 1932 to 1952, but it shares little else in common with the classic Hollywood Westerns of John Ford and Howard Hawks. Instead of the competent and macho men forging a new destiny as they head west, the men of "Meek's Cutoff" are filled with doubt about their journey. Based on a true account, the film tells the story of a group of settlers headed to Oregon who split from the main party and soon believe they're lost. The families find themselves in need of food and water, and fear the possibility that they're being stalked by Indians. Reichardt focuses mostly on the women of the party (including characters played by Michelle Williams and Zoe Kazan), forced to look on passively as the men make decisions that could imperil them all. Like those women, the camera is often removed from the main action, the image frequently obscured by a stray object or blade of grass. Along with September's screening of "Cleo from 5 to 7" and October's screening of "Persepolis," the Arkansas Times Film Series closes out the year by highlighting works written and directed by women and about women. Keep an eye out on series curator filmquotesfilm's Soundcloud page for a podcast discussion of "Meek's Cutoff." OJ

TUESDAY 11/15

MARCELLA & HER LOVERS
9 p.m., the White Water Tavern. $5

Like many zydeco musicians, Marcella Simien comes to the genre by way of family ties; her father, Terrance Simien, was a descendant of one of the first Creole families to settle in Louisiana's St. Landry Parish, and was among the reasons for the creation of an entirely new Grammy Award category: "Best Zydeco or Cajun Music Album," an accolade his group Terrance Simien and The Zydeco Experience scored for themselves in 2008. She's since moved to Memphis, where she went to art school and by way of a pseudonym, Fille Catatonique, and developed what's now her signature blend of Memphis soul and Louisiana zydeco. In performance, Marcella Simien is earthy, occasionally barefoot, using a bent knee to keep her stay grounded while she throws her head back for a big belty note, then just as easily switching into a sort of guttural tremolo. Though her rendition of straightforwardly soul numbers like "I'd Rather Go Blind" would settle any bets about her gifts as a strictly-vocals frontwoman, Simien's most in possession of an easy freedom of motion when she's wearing her accordion, matching the ebb and flow of those endlessly stretching origami folds with her hips. SS

click to enlarge WOMEN OF WAR COME HOME: The MacArthur Museum of Military History hosts a screening of JulieHera DeStefano's documentary "Journey to Normal," a collection of eight veteran women's stories about life after deployment to Afghanistan., 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, free.
  • WOMEN OF WAR COME HOME: The MacArthur Museum of Military History hosts a screening of JulieHera DeStefano's documentary "Journey to Normal," a collection of eight veteran women's stories about life after deployment to Afghanistan., 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, free.

WEDNESDAY 11/16

'JOURNEY TO NORMAL: WOMEN OF WAR COME HOME'
6:30 p.m. MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History. Free.

In March 2016, U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter approved final plans from military branches to open combat positions to women, lifting restrictions on the potential range of assignments women can take on in war. On Oct. 26, 10 women graduated from the U.S. Army's Infantry Basic Officer Leadership Course in Fort Benning, Ga., the first women to do so. Although the conversations about equal opportunity for women's military training and advancement are far from over, the "Journey to Normal" project and accompanying film focuses on what happens when those women become veterans, specifically women who served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Inspired by hearing a young veteran mother on "The Oprah Winfrey Show" in 2009 explain the difficulty of making a sandwich for her child after losing an arm in battle, JulieHera DeStefano put a film crew together, got on a plane and interviewed over 100 women in northeastern Afghanistan and even more in the U.S., compiling stories of their service and of their subsequent re-entry into American society. Since its release in the spring of 2015, the project's launched an online archive of the full interviews created for the film and new interviews from women who have added their stories, created a web portal for women veterans to connect with each other for support, and formed outreach programs for employers and behavioral health professionals to increase understanding of how best to treat veterans returning from combat. The MacArthur Museum screens DeStefano's film and will provide popcorn and beverages. SS


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