The Week That Was, July 21-27, 2010 

It was a good week for ...

CAREFUL SPENDING. The state Higher Education Department says it wants to continue a moratorium on new college campuses for 10 more years, given that the existing institutions are already under-supported.

VEHICLE INSPECTION. The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported that at least 414 state employees have state-owned cars they use for personal matters, based on income tax payments on the perk. Taxes constitute a fraction of the cost of buying and maintaining a car and personal use is arguably illegal, a taxpayer's lawsuit argues.

The GREEN PARTY. It nominated a slate of candidates for the November ballot, led by former state Rep. Jim Lendall as a gubernatorial nominee. They'll not only likely qualify for automatic ballot recognition in the future, their votes could prove spoilers (likely to Democratic candidates) in fall races. Some of them might even win.

The LITTLE ROCK SCHOOL BOARD. A motion to extend Superintendent Linda Watson's contract failed 4-3. No vote to extend her contract should have occurred without a full discussion of the board's evaluation of her work (obviously seen as lacking in a number of respects by some board members).

LITTLE ROCK NATIONAL AIRPORT. Higher rates on short-term parking meters have produced a 50 percent increase in meter revenue, a key source of operating income for the airport.

PRAYER. The ACLU accepted a lukewarm settlement with the city of North Little Rock over a complaint that the City Council opens each meeting with a prayer, typically sectarian. The city promises it will try real hard to discourage sectarian prayers. It would be so much easier to junk the hollow prayer exercise, but there's the American way and then there's the North Little Rock way, the latter never too concerned with the fine points of law and Constitution.

It was a bad week for ...

COMFORT. High heat — enhanced by oppressive humidity — led to several heat-related deaths.

NORTH LITTLE ROCK MAYOR PAT HAYS. With his usual lack of bull-in-china-shop planning, the mayor pushed the City council into a plan to build a natural-gas fueling station, mainly at the behest of a couple of gas companies. What's the actual cost? Will it be a continuing revenue drain on the city? Who cares? If Boss Hays wants it, Boss Hays gets it. Another cost to add to the city's deteriorating financial picture.



Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

Readers also liked…

  • Poor Tom

    Love and affection (not so much), School Inc., Rapert revealing God's plan, a cancer sniffin' dog and more.
    • Mar 10, 2015
  • Eligible voters removed from rolls

    Arkansas Times reporters contacted election officials around the state to see how they had handled flawed felon data from the secretary of state. Responses varied dramatically.
    • Aug 11, 2016
  • Real Republicans don't do pre-K

    Also, drifting away from trump, Hudson's downfall at ASU and more.
    • Aug 11, 2016

Most Shared

  • Issue 3: blank check

    Who could object to a constitutional amendment "concerning job creation, job expansion and economic development," which is the condensed title for Issue 3 for Arkansas voters on Nov. 8?
  • Little Rock police kill man downtown

    Little Rock police responding to a disturbance call near Eighth and Sherman Streets about 12:40 a.m. killed a man with a long gun, Police Chief Kenton Buckner said in an early morning meeting with reporters.
  • From the mind of Sol LeWitt: Crystal Bridges 'Loopy Doopy': A correction

    Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art is installing Sol Lewitt's 70-foot eye-crosser "Wall Drawing 880: Loopy Doopy," waves of complementary orange and green, on the outside of the Twentieth Century Gallery bridge. You can glimpse painters working on it from Eleven, the museum's restaurant, museum spokeswoman Beth Bobbitt said
  • Ted Suhl loses another bid for new trial; faces stiff sentencing recommendation

    Ted Suhl, the former operator of residential and out-patient mental health services, has lost a second bid to get a new trial on his conviction for paying bribes to influence state Human Services Department policies. Set for sentencing Thursday, Suhl faces a government request for a sentence up to almost 20 years. He argues for no more than 33 months.
  • Football and foster kids

    It took a football stadium to lay bare Republican budget hypocrisy in Arkansas.

Latest in The Week That Was

Visit Arkansas

Jodi Morris's lifelong ties to the National Park Service

Jodi Morris's lifelong ties to the National Park Service

"History is always happening" at Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site

Event Calendar

« »


2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31  

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments


© 2016 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation