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To-Do List, Dec. 3 

THURSDAY 12/3

 

 

CEDRIC BURNSIDE AND LIGHTNIN' MALCOLM

9:30 p.m., White Water Tavern. $10.

 

So far, so good. In October, Lucero took the Juke Joint Duo on the road, stopping in big venues in Nashville, Philly, New York and elsewhere. And at least so far, those shows haven't propelled the North Mississippi bluesmen into their deserved place in the stratosphere. And maybe it'll never happen. Maybe Ced and Malcolm will grow gray before they quit coming to White Water every couple of months. But if you've caught them live, you can't blame me for being worried. Their Hill Country blues — the raw rhythmic sound of North Mississippi — always turns the tavern into a dance party without compare. They've got an almost hallucinatory power. Last time I saw them, my feet weren't moving, the floor was. Best keep on as if this is your last chance to ever see 'em again. LM.

 

 

HILL COUNTRY REVUE/ THE LEE BOYS

8:30 p.m., Revolution. $10.

 

Hill Country Revue operates in a mode similar to the North Mississippi Allstars — all jam-y juke joint-inspired blues rock — which isn't much of a surprise considering the groups share guitarist Cody Dickinson and bassist Chris Chew. While Cody's brother Luther's off playing with the Black Crowes, Hill Country Revue will keep us shakin' on down, no problem. Openers the Lee Boys should get crowd circulation flowing. The Miami-based outfit plays a spicy blend of gospel-themed funk in the Sacred Steel tradition spawned from origins within the House of God church. PP

 

 

FRIDAY 12/4

 

LUCERO

8 p.m., the Village. $15 adv., $20 d.o.s.

 

Lucero's bringing it all back home. Or home away from home. Two months after the Memphis rockers unveiled their sixth studio release, “1372 Overton Park,” Little Rock gets a taste. The album is the band's major label debut and, as major label debuts often do, it features a new sound. But only the most intractable fans of the band's busted-up country-rock will object. Because nothing livens up barroom rock 'n' roll like a horn section. Lucero front man (and Little Rock native) Ben Nichols points to Stax as a key influence in the new direction, but to these ears what comes out is much more the Boss, Replacements-style. So cross your fingers that the horn section hasn't been released from the tour. Even if they have, a Lucero gig in Little Rock's always an occasion for a mass audience sing-along. Look for this to be the rare gig that fills the Village to the brim. Two of Little Rock's pop-rock contenders, Whale Fire and Big Boots, open the show. LM.

 

 

‘THE LAST

WHITE CLASS'

7:30 p.m., Weekend Theater. $10-$14.

 

In case you didn't get the subtext in the title of the latest drama to play at the Weekend Theater, there's a subtitle: “A Play About Neighborhood Terror.” Co-written by novelist and poet Marge Piercy and her husband, Ira Wood, the play tells the tale of inner city neighborhoods in mid-'70s Boston at the advent of court-ordered public school desegregation. An African-American family living in a white neighborhood plays a central role. They're surrounded by whites who believe that public education as an institution will cease to exist after the last white class graduates. Naturally, there's a lot of tension for Piercy, Wood and director Ralph Hyman to work with. The drama runs through Dec. 19. LM.

SATURDAY 12/5

 

PAUL WALL

10 p.m., Revolution. $18 adv.

 

What do household-name rappers do when their star dims? If you're Paul Wall, Houston's favorite white rapper/torchbearer for DJ Screw, you diversify. You form a super-group — with Travis Barker and the Transplants' Skinhead Rob — that sounds way cooler on paper than it does in actuality, and, because your group's called Expensive Taste, you form a clothing line. You tour with Tech N9ne, the most established indie rapper around, and you stretch yourself to play “Grillionaire,” in the Tucker Max dude debacle, “I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell.” You release an album, “Fast Lane,” that has no single. And mostly, you continue to push those jewel-encrusted teeth covers known as grills, and push hard. Grills By Paul Wall isn't the third thing that comes up in Google when you search “grills,” behind Weber Grills and Walmart, for nothing! (Surely the low-cost variety is huge. I've got my eye on the Karat Salad). Some of the best in local hip-hop, Suga City and 607, open, with g-force DJing. LM.

 

 

SUNDAY 12/6

 

CENTRAL ARKANSAS ROLLER DERBY/ FRONTIER CIRCUS

5 p.m., Skate World. $10.

 

Arkansas's favorite performance rock miscreants (as someone at the Times once called them) the Rockin' Guys may be on semi-permanent hiatus, but the Goat Hill, Ark.-based act's particular voodoo appears to have taken root in a new group. At halftime of the Central Arkansas Roller Derby's bout with the PrissKilla Prezleys from Memphis, Frontier Circus provides the entertainment. Frontier Dan, who looks a lot like Rockin' Dan of the Rockin' Guys, is the ringmaster, singing, playing “circus” guitar and, Lord help us, the Theremin. The great Red Neckerson, of “Red Neckerson's Radio Round Up” fame (go to redneckerson.blogspot.com stat), also plays guitar and sings and folks named Lightnin' Lou and Wylie Peyote round out the group on bass and drums, respectively. Like the Rockin' Guys, but with a “psycho-Western” bent, Frontier Circus looks to take songs that you might know — like, say, Donovan's “Season of the Witch” or Webb Pierce's “There Stands the Glass” — and subvert (read: destroy) the hell out of them. LM.

 

TUESDAY 12/8

 

MISFITS

8 p.m., Village. $21 adv., $25 d.o.s.

 

The Misfits, named after Marilyn Monroe's final movie, were born in 1977 in a small New Jersey town at the onset of the punk movement and are widely credited as originators of “horror punk.” Primal, aggressive, confrontational and lyrically violent, the Misfits brand endures today in this post-Danzig era. Acknowledging his band's “cool factor,” bassist Jerry Only has said, “I think we created a niche. We stuck to what we did, and we did it well. We never tried to pull something over on people. Besides, I think the love of the horror art form has endured.” Indeed. PP.

 

WEDNESDAY 12/9

 

CURSIVE

8 p.m., Revolution. $12 adv., $14 d.o.s.

 

They've been together for almost 15 years, but it hasn't been easy. The members of Cursive have broken up at least once and the band's gone on a three-year hiatus twice between albums. After 2006's “Happy Hollow,” original drummer Clint Schnase quit. With guitarist/vocalist Tim Kasher lately wrapped up in his side-project the Good Life, Cursive's “Mama, I'm Swollen,” released this past spring, came almost by surprise. The album finds the band evolving, or in Kasher's case, contemplating growing old —  “I spent the best years of my life waiting on the best years of my life,” he yelps on “What Have I Done?” Sonically, even with a new drummer, there are still shifting time signatures and more than a few moments of dissonance, but, overall, the material is more restrained, subdued even. If recent show reviews are any indication, the band's live show is all about covering the full catalog, though. Omaha's Capgun Coup opens along with the See, fresh off a mini-tour of surrounding states. LM.

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