To-Do List, July 1-7 


8 p.m., Verizon Arena. $47-$152

"Their Greatest Hits (1971-1975)" has sold 29 million copies to date. They were the first band to sell a $100 concert ticket during their 1994 "Hell Freezes Over" tour. They're inescapable on radio waves. For as successful as their storied career in rock music has been, The Eagles definitely do not rock. Their spines don't have LSD scars like Lennon or McCartney's and there's not a single Jagger swagger to be found in any of them. It seems the older generation has a tenuous grasp on their group fanaticism towards the band. The younger heads are beyond dismissive of the old, gritless M.O.R. outfit, all while embracing Fleetwood Mac, Steely Dan and others from the Eagles' ilk. What did the Frey, Henley, Walsh and friends ever do to deserve such apathy from so many? How can they be, arguably, the most successful touring act of the last 20 years and maybe the most successful band of the '70s while still invoking so many shrugs and scoffs? After all, they never claimed to be anything but a troupe of California country musicians and they've been unapologetically so for four decades. Is it an over-accessibility that makes them so easy to dismiss and so hard to be fanatical about? I wish I had the answers about the questions that surround the legacy of one of the most bafflingly successful band that's ever recorded. All I know is that if "Peaceful Easy Feeling," "Get Over It" or almost any other piece of their PG-rated pop comes over the airwaves at just the right time, The Eagles, unlike any other easy-going act, can hit just the right chord in your own subconscious because they're so deep within it. JT.


8 p.m., Revolution. $25 adv., $30 d.o.s.

If the jam-packed crowd at the Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick concert in April at Revolution is any indication, Central Arkansas is hungry for old school rap heroes. That's what local promoter Chris Bowen is thinking anyway with Whodini, who along with the likes of Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five and The Fat Boys were among the first rap acts to enjoy a national following. On one hand, the Brooklyn trio, of Jalil, Ecstasy (who, back in the day, always wore a Zorro-style hat) and DJ Grandmaster Dee, sounds its age, all plodding and passe rhymes. But on the other, dudes had a keen sense for production and a hook. Even if today we're growing weary of AutoTune, the vocorder and all other permutations of the robot voice, "Freaks Come Out at Night" remains a jam for the ages. "Five Minutes of Funk," too. Look for nostalgia to carry the show. And 607, who grows weirder and stronger as an MC by the minute, opens. Fifty bones gets you what Bowen calls "lavish" VIP treatment. LM

9 p.m., Juanita's. $13 adv., $15 d.o.s.

These guys are a Frankenstein of every genre you like from the last five decades. They're a dollop of the '60s British invasion jingle-jangle, '70s post-hippie harmony, '80s new-wave attitude, '90s college-rock intuition and '00s indie-pop bop. It's an effortless melange of influence that's kept them in studios and on the road since their debut in 2003, which, for the record, opened with one of the best pieces of California-dusted pop of the decade in their Ric Ocasek-produced, Mamas and Papas-in-the-garage single "Blueside." They're joined by The Young Veins, a Kinks-biting (I mean that in the best way) '60s psych act formed by two ex-pats from baroque emo superstars Panic! At the Disco, and Black Gold, a promising summer pop duo already gaining notoriety as the guys behind the outro from "So You Think You Can Dance." JT.


8 p.m., Timberwood Amphitheater. $29.99-$44.99


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