To-do list, June 26 




8 p.m., Arkansas Flag and Banner. $5.


What would you say if I told you that you could hear new, sure-to-be-compelling local music and support a good cause all in the same three hours? What would you expect that to cost? Fifty dollars? One hundred dollars? How 'bout $5, like it says an inch above? That's right, for half a sawbuck you can support the Backyard Garden Project and the Arkansas Sustainability Network and catch Eclipse Glasses, the new local act that includes vets of dozens of great local bands — Kyle Carpenter, Lorenza Harrington, Colin Miles, Andrew Morgan and Zach Reeves. This is the band's debut show. Morgan says they'll be doing an amalgamation of “funk, soul, electro, Afrobeat, reggae, weirdo disco.” I've got high hopes. The Backyard Garden Project is an initiative that's helping folks create backyard gardens, particularly those who are clients of local foodbanks. The Arkansas Sustainability Network, like its name suggests, is a non-profit aimed at fostering sustainable development. All ages welcome.






5:30 p.m., River Market Pavilions. $22-$30.

The four keys to maximizing your Foam Fest experience: Eat a big lunch, make sure you're hydrated, recruit 10 friends and line up a sober bus. Then, for four hours, drink steadily and broadly, sampling more than 65 varieties of beer and wine, while head-nodding and, later, singing (slurring) along to local cover bands. All proceeds benefit the Arthritis Foundation. The music kicks off at 5:30 p.m. with Saline County's most active blues act, the Mike Dollins Band. At 6:30 p.m., good-time cover band Crisis! plays a broad range of recognizable rock covers. Jam band Weakness for Blondes follows at 7:30, and local dance favorite Mr. Happy helps close down the event at 8:30. Just before the drink-a-thon ends, a people's choice award will be presented to the favorite brew. If you're in a group of 10 or more, admission is $22. Advance tickets are available at foamfest.org.




10 p.m., Downtown Music. $5.


Here's a slogan I can get behind: “Brought to you by dance music and cheap beer.” That's the tag for Cool Shoes, the regular dance/art party that man-about-town TJ Deeter is hosting. The inaugural party, held last month, was billed as Little Rock's answer to Club MTV. Dancers were filmed and performers shoes' were interviewed (really), but Deeter says the party won out over the concept. So those who were wary of grinding for hundreds of web-video watchers can now get-low carefree. Helping move butts: Deeter, who briefly was TJDJ's, but never TJ the DJ, and is now just simply Deeter. Plus, representing the 4X4 Crew, DJ Fatality, and — composed of two local dudes who you'll probably recognize from seeing out — Broez B4 Hoez. Like last time, a performer will take the mic for one song. This time it's local polemicist 607. It'll be a bustle of activity: Dirtbag is doing graffiti art throughout the night and Magpie and Birdie host a trunk show of vintage clothes. All ages welcome.




9:30 p.m., Sticky Fingerz. $5.


Give it up for a few people making big noises. As anyone who followed the Arkansas Times Musicians Showcase earlier this year knows, Kyoto Boom kicks out new-wavy jams befitting arena stages. Drummer Duke Boyne and guitarist Dave Raymond are extremely adept and precise at what they do, but the bigness comes, most of all, courtesy of Scott Cook, who plays keyboard and bass and sings full-throated with a voice that's more real-deal rock 'n' roll than anyone in town. Opening the show, which Boyne curated, is one-man band Nathan Brown, AKA Browningham. Known to local concertgoers as a crooner in the Michael McDonald mold, Brown comes to Sticky Fingerz armed with new material that he's performing with a guitar with keyboard, bass and drum loops backing him. After Kyoto Boom plays, DJ Rod Bryan spins a specific mix — Ghanaian funk, political punk and American Southern soul ex-pats.



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