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TV highlights, Jan. 11 

James Lewis
  • James Lewis

JUST JORDAN
Nickelodeon (Comcast Ch. 61)
6:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 14

We love to hear stories of Arkansans made good — those Arkies who manage to grab a bit of the spotlight for themselves. One Little Rockian who is on his way up right now is 16-year-old comedian and actor James Lewis, who goes by the stage name “Lil’ JJ.” From a start as a class clown at Mitchell Elementary, Lewis played comedy clubs before finally working his way up to supporting roles in movies. Now, he’s got a new series from kids’ network Nickelodeon: “Just Jordan.” In the show, Lewis plays a Little Rock kid who moves to Los Angeles with his divorced mother. Trying to hold down a social life and keep his grades up, Lewis’ character also finds time to work in his grandfather’s diner. Tune in, and catch a rising star.


NATURE: THE BEST OF 25 YEARS
7 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 14
AETN (Comcast Ch. 3, Broadcast Ch. 2)

Though the cable dial is crowded with herds of animal programming — they’ve even got a whole channel devoted to critters, “Animal Planet” — we’re still partial to one of the oldest and most well-established programs on TV: PBS’ long-running series “Nature.” With amazingly intimate shots of the world’s rarest and most camera-shy animals, we’ve often watched in puzzlement at how they managed to sneak a lens into a burrow, warren, den or nest to capture some of the footage they do. Here, producers celebrate their 25th anniversary with some of the show’s most incredible footage, including egg-laying sea turtles, hunting snow leopards and male bald eagles sparring for a mate.


THE BLACK PRESS: SOLDIERS WITHOUT SWORDS
9 p.m. Monday, Jan. 15
AETN (Comcast Ch. 3, Broadcast Ch. 2)

While you’d think we’d swallow enough ink at work, we’re suckers for the historical side of newspapers and newspaperin’ as well. The history of journalism is full of colorful and courageous characters, though none are perhaps so brave as the pioneering figures in black journalism. Often working under the threat of pain or death, black reporters and editors were voices in the wilderness in the days of Jim Crow, helping expose the violence of slavery, the brutality of lynching and the absolute necessity of civil rights for all. Here, historians, photographers and reporters talk about black journalism and its role in shaping American society.

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