TV highlights 

ALONG FOR THE RIDE: HANK WILLIAMS SR. 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 4 AETN (Comcast Ch. 3, Broadcast Ch. 2) With all the glitz, glamor, flag-waving, posing, preaching and plain ol’ junk on the country music charts these days it’s hard to believe that the best ever is still a simple country boy who died when he was only 30 years old. Hank Williams Sr. was a true musical genius, cranking out a string of hits that include gems such as “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” and “Your Cheatin’ Heart” before dying in the backseat of his Cadillac on the way to a gig. While fads and fashion may pass away, Hank will be with us forever. Tune in for the short life and times of an American original. P.O.V.: THE HOBART SHAKESPEARIANS 9 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6 AETN (Comcast Ch. 3, Broadcast Ch. 2) We fully believe in the genius and power of Shakespeare. Through his all-too-human portrayals of characters great and small, ol’ Will was one of the first writers to capture the human animal in all its lewd, boastful, complicated beauty. Another believer in the healing power of the Bard is teacher Dale Esquith. An educator in inner-city L.A., Esquith began having his fifth-graders read and perform Shakespeare plays primarily as a way to improve their reading skills. The class soon learned much more about themselves through Shakespeare’s plays than he ever taught them about reading and writing. Here, the documentary program “P.O.V.” takes the viewer inside Esquith’s classroom where young minds are touched every day by a man who died more than 300 years ago. MIAMI INK 9 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 6 TLC (Comcast Ch. 68) While tattoos will probably never be considered mainstream, acceptance by the Gen X-and-younger set has brought this ancient art into a whole new light. These days, you’re just as likely to see a tattoo on a straight-A sorority sister or buttoned-down banker as you are a biker or sailor. As chronicled in this new reality show from TLC, one group of artists helping to bring a newfound respect to tattoos and tattooing is Miami Ink, one of the hottest shops in Florida. For the uninitiated, or those used to seeing crude tattoos, the work of the company’s four partners is a revelation: intricate, soulful, beautiful images that seem to stand off the skin by way of vibrant colors and subtle shading you’d expect from pen-and-paper art. Even more interesting are the stories of the artists themselves, and the people who come into their shop. Like scars, there’s a story behind every tattoo, it seems — from mourning to joy — and on “Miami Ink” those stories stand out as vibrantly as the inkwork.


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