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War Memorial Park 

War Memorial Park

David Caldwell, writing about the fate of Ray Winder Field, said no one is turning green space into a parking lot then goes on to say the only expansion would be where the baseball field is. What is a baseball field if not a green space?  Furthermore, he compares Little Rock to cities that don't have a whole lot of green spaces. Do we have to follow suit? As for his completely asinine comment about going to a park rather than a hospital for emergency treatment, the less said the better.

I not only work at UAMS, I also live with my wife and three kids in the neighborhood to the east, Stifft Station, and I believe if you look at any map of Little Rock, except for a few cemeteries and small community gardens and parks, there is absolutely nothing green between MacArthur Park and War Memorial Park, and from 24th St./Asher to Kavanaugh in Hillcrest. That is a pretty significant chunk of concrete.

Yes, UAMS is a large employer and a great place to work. But surely the administration could work a little harder at looking for an alternative.  They have already encroached into the Stifft Station neighborhood by tearing down the city block between Cedar and Pine to put in a parking lot. Why didn't they build a multi-level parking deck there?  Why doesn't UAMS knock down the apartment block in front of the biomedical building on Plateau and put a multi there? Or better still, knock down the apartment block right by the freeway on West Seventh and put it there.

I believe UAMS has several options for employee parking that do not involve the destruction of one of our nicer green spaces in Midtown.

Brian Hirrel

Little Rock

 

I've read your editorials regarding Ray Winder and War Memorial Park and have been consistently disappointed by your lack of attention to the facts. Rather than take personal and petty swipes at me, your readers would be better served if you focused on the relevant information.

In no way am I “squirming with eagerness to get rid of the city park” in my district. In fact, the city-owned land under Ray Winder amounts to 3.8 acres out of an over 200-acre park. The 3.8 acres the city owns is only half the land under Ray Winder. The other 3.5 acres belongs to the state. While the city-owned portion is zoned “park and open space,” it ceased being either in the early 1930s when Ray Winder was built. It is now an asphalt parking lot and an aging baseball stadium separated from the rest of the park and zoo by Jonesboro Avenue.

Your editorial also fails to acknowledge that if the land is sold, the proceeds must be used to buy additional land for War Memorial Park. Money remaining after additional land is purchased must be used to make improvements at War Memorial Park. The master plan for War Memorial calls for expanding the park south of Interstate 630. This would complement the new children's library that will be built on the edge of the park between Twelfth Street and the Interstate and the Twelfth Street revitalization efforts.

You suggest that if the city disposes of this land, the rest of the park will follow. If you can cite an instance where the city has been irresponsible in its disposition of park land please do so.

Stacy Hurst

Little Rock City Director

Outing the signers

I note where Jerry Cox, resident Pharisee and chief bigot, is indignant that the petition signers of Act 1 have been “outed.”
He calls it an attempt to intimidate these folks. It would seem that if they feel so righteous about their agenda they'd be quite proud for their names to be associated with it.

The simple fact that they tried to call it a crusade against fostering by unwed couples when it was obviously designed to thwart gay folks shows how they can readily lie while pretending higher ideals. Christ would be embarrassed by their use of his name.

There is no record that he or the apostles had children, but he did admonish them to allow children to come to him, for such is the kingdom of God. He was a single man as were most of the apostles. They traveled often in company with women to whom they were not wed! Would Mr. Jerry Cox and those bigots forbid them access to children in defiance of Jesus' command?

It just boils down to the fact that Jerry and his ilk have set themselves up as self-declared arbiters of what we lesser mortals should live by.

Karl Hansen

Hensley

 

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