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Dining Review

South on Main's brunch is a crowd-pleaser

December 14, 2017
South on Main's brunch is a crowd-pleaser
It's a breakfast smorgasbord. /more/

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Columnists

Max Brantley

In black and white

The men and women who patrol Little Rock in black and white vehicles /more/

Ernest Dumas

Silly acts, good law

It was unavoidable that the struggle by sexual minorities to gain the equal treatment that the Constitution promises them would devolve into silliness and that the majestic courts of the land would have to get their dignity sullied in order to resolve the issues. /more/

Gene Lyons

A difference

How low can a columnist go? On evidence, nowhere near as low as the president of the United States. I'd intended to highlight certain ironies in the career of U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.). The self-anointed moral arbiter of the Senate began her career as a tobacco company lawyer — that is, somebody ill-suited to demand absolute purity of anybody, much less Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.). /more/

Movie Reviews

A hundred mirrors

December 14, 2017
A hundred mirrors
'The Disaster Artist' is meta-meta. /more/

Pearls About Swine

Morris takes off

December 14, 2017
Chad Morris' clear and present hurdle last week, upon being anointed as the Arkansas Razorbacks' sixth permanent head football coach in a quarter-century of occupancy in the Southeastern Conference, was to convince grumbling, listless fans that his credentials were something greater than the seemingly pedestrian 14-22 record in three seasons as the lead pony for the long-besieged SMU program. /more/

Blog Roll

Arkansas Blog

Hourly news and comment

Rock Candy

Music, art and eats in Arkansas

Arkansas Blog

Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 16:45:00

Thursday line's open


Does anyone have any good news?

 

Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 16:13:00

Four inmates charged in September attack of Arkansas correctional officers

The prosecuting attorney for Pine Bluff has charged four inmates in the Sept. 28 attack of two correctional officers, which began, the state police report says, over the confiscation of a "home-made hoodie."

According to the state police affidavit, Kirk Taylor Jr. approached officer Corey Lowery about the confiscation of the hoodie. Taylor then attacked and "cut and stabbed officer Lowery several times with a home-made weapon."

During this, three other inmates — Alfred Maxey, Jeremy Williams and Robert Rhodes  — joined in on the attack. Williams and Maxley did so by forcing the door open to a barracks and running down the hallway. Williams also attacked using a home-made weapon, the report says.

Another officer, Herbert Straughn, was also in the hallway and attempted to respond as the attack occurred, receiving "wounds to the back of his head and neck" in the process.

Eventually, more officers responded and the inmates fled into a barracks and "barricaded the doors."

On the same day, another attack occurred in the Tucker Maximum Security Unit and had "multiple injuries to face and head and was taken to a hospital for treatment."

 

Thursday, December 14, 2017 - 16:07:00

Hutchinson meets with Pence, urges caution on NAFTA

Governor Hutchinson made his pitch on the North American Free Trade Agreement to Vice President Pence in Washington D.C. today.

President Trump has threatened to pull the U.S. out of NAFTA, alarming farming and other business interests in Arkansas. Hutchinson is one of a number of Republican lawmakers this week meeting with White House officials to urge caution on any changes to NAFTA.

Hutchinson said in a press release:

I appreciate Vice President Pence for allowing governors to share our thoughts and concerns as our nation considers the future of NAFTA. The administration was clear that it wants to be able to negotiate a better NAFTA deal for American manufacturers and workers. The administration recognizes the importance of North American trade and prefers to modernize NAFTA under more fair terms that acknowledge the economic changes in the past 20 years.

I respect that negotiating position, but my message is that Arkansas must be able to continue its access to North American markets unimpeded by trade barriers. Otherwise, there will be serious harm to Arkansas agriculture, and retail and manufacturing sectors.

Continued cross-border trade with our North American partners is very important to our farmers and businesses. But as we consider trade agreements, and work toward fairness and modernization, we must remember the basic principle that we do no harm to our global trading relationships. It is clear that there is great potential for harm in Arkansas, especially to our farmers, if the United States reverses course regarding cross-border trade.

Canada is Arkansas’ number one customer and Mexico is our second largest customer.






 

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Tuesday, December 12, 2017 - 10:12:00

Windgate makes $300,000 grant to Pulaski Tech for arts

click to enlarge screen_shot_2017-12-12_at_10.09.30_am.png

A grant of $300,000 from the Windgate Charitable Foundation in Siloam Springs will promote UA Pulaski Tech's arts programming at its Center for Humanities and Arts (CHARTS), the college announced today.

The Windgate Foundation — which also provided $20.3 million for the new arts facility at UA Little Rock — has been a generous supporter of CHARTS, providing $1 million to furnish and equip the facility, which includes classrooms, a 450-seat theater and the Windgate Gallery, and providing a $500,000 challenge grant to create an endowment, which Pulaski Tech met.

Revenues from programming will be re-invested in CHARTS to help it become self-sustaining.

 

Monday, December 11, 2017 - 16:58:00

Make like the Big Lebowski this holiday! Dust Bowl may open before Christmas

click to enlarge Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge, 315 E. Capitol Ave.
  • Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge, 315 E. Capitol Ave.

The neon orange and green bowling pin signage is up, the bowling pin handles on the front door are attached and the Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge at 315 E. Capitol Ave. should blow in by Christmas, an owner says.

Adam Price, vice president and partner in parent company The McNellie’s Group of Tulsa, says he’s also “bullish” on the opening of Fassler Hall, the McNellie’s-owned restaurant next door at 307 E. Capitol: He’s hoping for a mid-January opening, though his crew is telling him February.

Until then, you’ll be able to eat, drink (full bar) and go for strikes in the vintage-furnished Dust Bowl, which is making use of the red leather bar front from the building’s former identity as the M.M. Eberts American Legion Post and is using seats and mid-century wire and diamond wall decor salvaged from a bowling alley in Pryor, Okla. The wooden lanes were also “harvested” from an Oklahoma business because “the sound when the ball hits the wood is more satisfying” than on today’s lane composites, Price said.

click to enlarge Construction on the Dust Bowl isn't quite complete, but the decor, salvaged from an Oklahoma alley, is up.
  • Construction on the Dust Bowl isn't quite complete, but the decor, salvaged from an Oklahoma alley, is up.
There are eight lanes — two of which are walled off for private parties — and a karaoke room down the hall from the bar. Final touches are being installed, and the fire marshal was expected this week.

When Fassler Hall opens, it will serve a simple menu of seven house-made sausages, schnitzel and more, along with German beers and local brews. It will seat around 200 inside and in the beer garden on the west side of the building, Price said. That patio happens to be in a nice safe spot: right next to the Little Rock Police substation at Capitol and Cumberland streets.

 

Monday, December 11, 2017 - 10:12:00

"I Live My Life the Way I Play Music": A Q & A with Tommy Emmanuel

click to enlarge image003_1_.jpg

Grammy-award winning guitarist Tommy Emmanuel will be performing tonight at Reynolds Performance Hall in Conway. The show will feature one full set of solo classic acoustic songs and a full set of Christmas favorites with Pat Berguson, John Knowles CGP and Anne Sellick. We caught up with him by phone on Friday afternoon in Wichita, Kansas, while he was backstage resting before that evening's show.

When you're playing live, how much of your show is improvised and how much is repeated from previous shows?

Like everybody, we all have our bag of licks and things that we like and have learned, but when I'm taking solos, I'm totally improvising, whether it's "Jingle  Bells'' or "Guitar Boogie.'' I'm making music instantaneously.... My whole life is improvisation...I live my life the way I play music...I try to be spontaneous and make it up as I go along.

When you travel a lot, and play show after show, and you're meeting people night after night, you can get into a routine. When I arrived here today, I came into my dressing room and watched some Buddy Rich to inspire me. To see and hear someone do something at a level that is almost unreachable.

Buddy Rich, the drummer?

Yes, he's been an inspiration to me since I was a kid. I got to see him play three times live. One of the greatest musical experiences of my life, because of how he interpreted the music from a drummer's perspective. He played the drums as if he knew the big picture of the song....he just wasn't playing the drums...he was driving the whole band....he was inside the music. I'm trying to tap into creativity almost on a spiritual level.

I know Chet Atkins was a major influence. Did he improvise when he played?

Chet was a great improviser....he approached melody like a singer, that's how I learned....by imagining that my guitar is actually the vocal...When I work out an arrangement of a song I'll go listen to Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan or Frank Sinatra sing that song and hear how they phrase that melody, how they approached that melody.

What about singing? How do you feel about your voice, your singing?

I've never considered myself a singer, but I love singing because it's the first instrument.....it makes you feel good physically to sing....spiritually, emotionally, everything.....in my show, especially when I'm playing solo, if I put a couple of vocal tunes in.....it kind of breaks things up and gives people a different sound to focus on.....and then I can play around.

Have you studied singing, worked on it?

Not really, I've never had any training. I asked a singer one time that I really respect, a really great singer from Australia, Can you tell me about singing? What I need to work on? And his advice was, Open your mouth and push it out! (laughs)

A lot of it has to do with your breathing.....a singer as good as James Taylor.....first of all, you never hear a bad note.....and you never hear him take a breath.....he knows how to breathe thru his nose and blow out his mouth.

Frank Sinatra learned how to "circular" breathe.....you try to sing along with Frank Sinatra and you're going to run out of breath.....if you want to learn about singing there are so many places you can go to.....it's all about getting a tone and getting the pitch right.

Tell me about great melodies. What do think makes a melody great? Do you think you've written any great melodies, why or why not?

I don't know if I've written any great melodies....I know I've written melodies that I like and I've written melodies that people like and that's a great reason to keep going at it. ... It's pretty hard to write something as good as Leonard Bernstein "Somewhere" from West Side Story....(Emmanuel sings the melody)...."There's a place for us...."

I don't waste time listening to things that don't move me.

Some people say the elements of a great melody are mysterious, unfathomable. What do you think?

I can tell you certain elements.....For instance, George Harrison is a writer who has a similar formula.....he'll always use diminished chords.....because they're full of emotions.....and full of mystery.....then he'll sing a melody line, and then he'll sing the same line but change the chord from minor to major or the other way.....and it just becomes powerful.....having moving chords underneath a simple melody is a really good tool as well.....if you look at John Lennon's "Imagine".....the chords are constantly moving.....then sings the melody.....it's almost like a question and answer writing.....(Emmanuel sings the tune to "Imagine.")

Who are some of your favorite musicians playing today who should be better known?

Jack Pearson from Nashville. ...one of the greatest musicians I've seen....he sings everything from the Reverend Gary Davis to Allman Brothers music.....has one of those high beautiful sounding voices that you can't get enough of.


A young man from Australia named Joe Robinson...he's a great talent.....only 20 or 21 …..doing great work.


From Croatia...young boy...called Frano Zivkovic...he can play anything from classical music to my songs, he writes songs...he's only 12 years old...he's a genius....Frano has been on tour with me many times.


How would you describe this period of music we're living through, driven by the Internet with all the opportunities to listen to music, study it, create and distribute it worldwide?

This is one of the luckiest generations, but at the same time they have no excuses. If you can't pick something up.....I've had so many people say, "Couldn't you give me instructions, couldn't you give me the tabs?" And I say, "No, watch the video of me playing it and work it out." People don't even want to do that, even though it's right in front of them.

What is your feeling about musical talent, where it comes from, how to develop it?

Talent is a gift that comes in different forms. And everybody has a different one. Somebody can hear a piece of music and memorize the whole thing because that's how they're wired. I tried to learn how to read music, but I just had a mental block with it. I just couldn't get it at all. But I can hear a piece of music and play it back to you almost instantaneously.

I really admire people who can read a piece of sheet music and instantly make music. Like John Williams the classical guitar player; he can play Bach, stuff that's damn near impossible to play. Not only can he play it, but he can sight read it and play it. That is unbelievable! With whatever gifts you've been given, you have to make the most of them.

Do you think you're a better player now that ten, fifteen years ago? What about in ten years from now? What about plateauing?

I'm taking care of myself, staying happy and healthy. If I see some footage back in '96, '97, '98, I can see that my hands were a lot quicker back then, my hands were a lot more precise, but I think my ideas are better now. There is more depth in my ideas, although physically I'm not as on top of it as I used to be. I still enjoy the challenge. And I beg, steal and borrow from everybody I come into contact with.

 

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The class of 2016

December 14, 2017
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First-time candidates outraged by Trump's election off the bench and into state and local races. /more/
 

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