CEO to depart St. Vincent | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, July 25, 2006

CEO to depart St. Vincent

Posted By on Tue, Jul 25, 2006 at 11:08 AM

Stephen L. Mansfield is resigning as president and CEO of the St. Vincent Health System, effective Oct. 15, to take a job as head of the Methodist Health System in Dallas. He'll be succeeded on an interim basis by Ken Haynes, the system's current chief operating officer.

Full release on the jump.

ST. VINCENT NEWS RELEASE Stephen L. Mansfield, today, announced his resignation as president and CEO of St. Vincent Health System, effective October 15, 2006. In making his announcement, Mansfield indicated he would be accepting a position as president and CEO at Methodist Health System, in Dallas. Methodist Health System is comprised of Methodist Dallas Medical Center, Methodist Charlton Medical Center, Methodist Mansfield Medical Center, Methodist Midlothian Health Center, and three Methodist Family Health Centers. Mansfield will be succeeding Howard M. Chase, who is retiring as Methodist’s president and CEO. Mansfield joined St. Vincent on May 1, 2000 as president and CEO. He previously served as chief executive officer of Baptist Memorial Hospital-East, a division of Baptist Memorial Health Care Corporation in Memphis, TN. “I’m extremely proud to have had the opportunity to successfully guide St. Vincent through some difficult times, and I have total confidence that the organization’s current leadership team is fully capable of continuing the work we’ve started. My decision to leave St. Vincent at this particular time has much to do with St. Vincent’s readiness to grow and succeed in this market,” Mansfield said. Lunsford Bridges, St. Vincent Board chairman, applauded Mansfield’s efforts during his six years at St. Vincent’s helm. “Steve was unquestionably the right person for the job when he joined St. Vincent in 2000. Today, St. Vincent is a very different and much stronger organization because of Steve’s efforts and those of the extraordinary leadership team currently in place. We wish him nothing but the best as he makes this transition,” Bridges said. “We are blessed to have benefited from Steve’s leadership for these past six years.” Catholic Health Initiatives senior vice president of operations, Gary Campbell, also commended Mansfield for his leadership. “Steve has been an excellent steward of St. Vincent’s mission commitment in central Arkansas. CHI is focused on taking decisive steps to ensure St. Vincent’s continued progress in meeting the needs of the people who rely on the organization everyday.” Campbell said. The St. Vincent Board of Directors met in a special session Monday afternoon to unanimously select Ken Haynes, current senior vice president and chief operating officer, to serve as interim president and CEO. The Board, with the help of Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI), St. Vincent’s parent organization, will conduct a national search for Mansfield’s permanent replacement. Catholic Health Initiatives is a national non-profit health corporation based in Denver, Colorado. The CHI health system includes 70 hospitals; 43 long-term care, assisted and independent living and residential facilities; and two community-based health organizations located in 19 states. Catholic Health Initiatives represents approximately 66,000 employees and total revenues of $7.1 billion. It is the second largest Catholic health system in the United States. St. Vincent Health System became part of CHI in September 1997 as a result of the consolidation of the former Sisters of Charity of Nazareth Health System with CHI. St. Vincent Health System, founded in 1888, is one of Arkansas' leading health systems. It is comprised of five hospitals, a network of primary care clinics, a home health agency and numerous other joint ventures and entities. St. Vincent Infirmary Medical Center, an acute care facility, located in Little Rock, serves as the hub of the health system. Other St. Vincent hospitals include St. Vincent Doctors Hospital, in Little Rock; St. Vincent Medical Center/North and St. Vincent Rehabilitation Hospital, in Sherwood; and St. Anthony’s Medical Center, in Morrilton.

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