Saying no to coal | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, September 25, 2008

Saying no to coal

Posted By on Thu, Sep 25, 2008 at 1:15 PM

Just in is this report from Glen Hooks of the Sierra Club on action by the Governor's Commission on Global Warming (the commission is only advisory, but add more voices to the anti-coal pile):

The Governor’s Commission on Global Warming just took action on the side of public-minded citizens throughout the state of Arkansas, and recommended that no new coal-fired power plants be built in Arkansas unless and until they can safely sequester carbon dioxide emissions.  This will apply to the dirty plants proposed for southwest and northeast Arkansas. 

This is spectacular news:  a broad-based, inclusive state commission has looked at and studied the issue for several months, listened to all sides, and has come down in favor of protecting our state’s environmental and public health.  The members of the Commission are to be congratulated and thanked for their thorough and dedicated service.

It is our sincere hope that Governor Beebe and the Legislature will carefully consider and follow the Commission’s recommendations during the 2009 session, and keep dirty coal-fired power plants from being built in The Natural State.

Better to hold your breath in expectation of more coal emissions than to hold your breath waiting for the governor and legislature to do such a thing.

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (7)

Showing 1-7 of 7

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-7 of 7

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Three ead in WLR

    Three dead in suspected double murder-suicide in West Little Rock.
    • Aug 20, 2017
  • One dead in shooting at Buffalo National River

    KTHV reports a man was fatally shot Saturday at the Buffalo National River in Searcy County in what is being called an officer-involved shooting. No other details at the moment.
    • Aug 20, 2017
  • If it's really about history ..... read some

    The Confederate statue defenders in Hot Springs insist their regular demonstrations are about historic preservation, not white supremacy. History in books (if not on statues) tells another story.
    • Aug 20, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • More on how highways were used to wipe out "blight" of non-white neighborhoods

    Vox, a news website that concerns itself with energy and other issues, has a fine piece, including before and after images, on the history of the U.S. interstate system and why roads were built through the middle of cities (unless people of influence stopped them — see Manhattan, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.)
    • Mar 22, 2016
  • Civil War over in Fort Smith; lawyer strikes his Rebel mascot battle tent

    KSFM reports that Joey McCutchen, the lawyer who's been trying to restart the Civil War in Fort Smith over the School Board's decision to drop the Rebel mascot and related trappingsfor Southside High School, is dropping his School Board takeover campaign.
    • May 27, 2016
  • The long and winding road: No exception yet for 30 Crossing

    The Arkansas highway department's representative on the Metroplan board of directors told the board today that the department is requesting an exception to the planning agency's cap on six lanes for its 30 Crossing project to widen Interstate 30 from six to 10 (and more) lanes.
    • Jun 29, 2016

Most Shared

  • Take yourself there: Mavis Staples coming to LR for Central High performance

    Gospel and R&B singer and civil rights activist Mavis Staples, who has been inspiring fans with gospel-inflected freedom songs like "I'll Take You There" and "March Up Freedom's Highway" and the poignant "Oh What a Feeling" will come to Little Rock for the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the desegregation of Central High.
  • Klan's president

    Everything that Donald Trump does — make that everything that he says — is calculated to thrill his lustiest disciples. But he is discovering that what was brilliant for a politician is a miscalculation for a president, because it deepens the chasm between him and most Americans.
  • On Charlottesville

    Watching the Charlottesville spectacle from halfway across the country, I confess that my first instinct was to raillery. Vanilla ISIS, somebody called this mob of would-be Nazis. A parade of love-deprived nerds marching bravely out of their parents' basements carrying tiki torches from Home Depot.
  • Lynchings hidden in the history of the Hot Springs Confederate monument

    Hot Springs twice erupted into the kind of violence that has its roots in the issues left unresolved by the Civil War, and both times, it happened right where that monument to Confederate soldiers stands today.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation