Lottery arguments | Arkansas Blog

Monday, October 13, 2008

Lottery arguments

Posted By on Mon, Oct 13, 2008 at 11:31 AM

Oral arguments on the challenge of the lottery amendment were held before the Supreme Court today. Backers of the amendment feel good about how it went. Most of the court's questions seemed to go to the challenger's lawyer, Martha Adcock, and the sense was that she didn't get far in defending key challenge points. Justice Donald Corbin said the lottery proposal seemed straightforward to him. Defenders of the amendment argued that the amendment would not open any legal doors to casinos and, even if it did, political obstacles would be huge. They also have argued previously that the legislature could already allow casinos now if they chose -- that is if you don't already think we have casinos at Oaklawn and Southland.

Anyone out there drop by?

Family Council fulminates on the jump. A spokesman for the lottery forces, Bud Jackson, provides a short response: "Sounds like Mr. Cox had a bad day at the Supreme Court."

FAMILY COUNCIL STATEMENT

Today, the Arkansas Supreme Court heard oral arguments from both sides of the lawsuit to remove the State-run lotteries and casinos amendment from the ballot.

While the Court has yet to hand down a ruling—and probably will not for a number of days—it is interesting to note Lt. Governor Halter’s take on the proceedings.

In a press conference following the arguments, Halter worked very hard to marginalize Family Council Action Committee’s work on this issue. Dismissing our efforts as undemocratic and desperate, Halter made it a point numerous times to refer to us as a “special interest group,” even though H.O.P.E. for Arkansas’ only interest seems to be the passage of Amendment 3.

When asked if his lottery proposal would open Arkansas up to State-run casinos like they have in Kansas, Halter acted as if Kansas did not have any casinos at all—even though I drive past one of the State-run casinos every time my wife and I visit her parents in Parsons, KS.

The fact of the matter is that this proposal would give the State of Arkansas full authority to establish and operate State-run casinos in every town in every part of the state. Despite being asked numerous times today by members of the Court and the press, neither Halter himself, nor any member of his legal team, nor any member of his staff would answer definitively that this proposal does not open Arkansas up to casino gaming. It’s because they all know that it will, and none of them wants to admit it.

Halter says the Action Committee is trying to prevent the people of Arkansas from voting. I would like to ask Mr. Halter which he feels is worse: To prevent the people from voting on a proposal, or to knowingly offer a deceptive amendment to the voters without providing all the facts?

The people of Arkansas have a right to know the full effects of proposed Amendment 3. Go to http://www.VoteAgainstTheLottery.com to learn more.

Sincerely,
David Cox
Executive Director


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