UCA ups tuition | Arkansas Blog

Friday, May 7, 2010

UCA ups tuition

Posted By on Fri, May 7, 2010 at 3:50 PM

The University of Central Arkansas joined ASU with a board-approved tuition increase today. It's equivalent to a 3.1 percent rise, said a campus statement, which emphasized that the increase was smaller than that at many other campuses and necessary because of state budget cuts.

Not to worry. The lottery will fix all that, right?

UCA RELEASE

UCA President Allen C. Meadors' Statement on Tuition and Fee Increase for 2010-11 Academic Year:
 
The University of Central Arkansas Board of Trustees approved an increase in tuition and fees for the 2010-11 academic year during its meeting on May 7.
 
A $1 per credit hour tuition increase approved by the board will generate approximately $285,000.  A $3 per credit hour increase in library fee, recommended by the students and faculty, will help support library resources and services as well as extend library hours of operation.
 
Revenue from the $3 per credit hour increase in the athletic fee will pay salaries currently being funded from instruction and will free up funds for use in the academic areas. A portion of the athletic fee revenue will also cover additional costs of scholarship increases and fund across the board salary increases for non-classified employees and faculty.
 
The tuition and fee increase equates to a 3.1 percent increase for tuition and fees for undergraduate students and a 2.6 percent increase for graduate students. The percentage increase is near, if not, the lowest compared with other institutions within the state.
 
We realize that the increase tuition and fees may come at a bad time during this struggling economy.  However, the university, like others throughout the state, has seen cuts in its budget. The university’s state appropriations was cut $2.3 million during this fiscal year.  A state cut implemented in January forced us to reduce academics by 1% of its budget and all non-academic areas were reduced by 2%.  We made sure those cuts did not impact student instruction.
 
Along with the state cuts, additional revenue was needed to cover the rising cost of property, liability, workers compensation and unemployment insurances as well as an increase to the university's current budget for utilities.
 
The university has been frugal in its spending and our budget for fiscal year 2011 is conservative and reflects the state cuts.  Even with our cost saving measures over the past year, we cannot continue to cut operating budgets and provide the same level of quality education and service.
 
It is our goal to sustain our strong academic programs; maintain the small student-to-faculty ratio; and enhance the services we provide our students. 
 
While we do not like raising our tuition and fees, we know the reduction of state appropriations and the rising cost of operation requires us to do so in order to maintain the quality academic programs to meet the diverse needs of our students.


Favorite

Comments (11)

Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-11 of 11

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • State probing illness outbreak among Fayetteville beer garden customers

    The Health Department Monday said it was investigating a cluster of illnesses among recent customers of JJ's Beer Garden and Brewery in Fayetteville. It's seeking anyone who experienced diarrhea or vomiting after a visit there between Sept. 13 and Monday.
    • Sep 25, 2018
  • Pine Bluff native wages war on fraternity culture

    Bloomberg has an interesting feature on Deborah Dunklin Tipton of Memphis, a native of Pine Bluff and heiress to an Arkansas agricultural fortune, who's put her money to work investigating the death of her son Robert in 2012 of what's been ruled an accidental drug overdose following fraternity hazing at High Point University in North Carolina.
    • Sep 25, 2018
  • Special master clears minimum wage initiative

    Special Master Sam Bird said today that the proposed minimum wage initiated act had sufficient valid signatures to qualify for the November ballot. The Arkansas Supreme Court will review the decision and make the final call.
    • Sep 24, 2018
  • More »

Readers also liked…

Slideshows

Most Viewed

  • Pine Bluff native wages war on fraternity culture

    Bloomberg has an interesting feature on Deborah Dunklin Tipton of Memphis, a native of Pine Bluff and heiress to an Arkansas agricultural fortune, who's put her money to work investigating the death of her son Robert in 2012 of what's been ruled an accidental drug overdose following fraternity hazing at High Point University in North Carolina.
  • More national attention to Arkansas's flawed Medicaid work rule

    The New York Times is the latest to focus unflattering attention on Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson's Medicaid work rule, which has already eliminated 4,300 from medical coverage. Many thousands more are likely to come.  One big problem: People don't know the rule exists.

Most Recent Comments

 

© 2018 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation