A victory in Texarkana | Arkansas Blog

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

A victory in Texarkana

Posted By on Wed, May 19, 2010 at 8:28 AM

A note from the border: Carlton Jones won a 70-30 primary victory to be elected prosecuting attorney in Texarkana.

Jones is black, it so happens. Black prosecutors are a rarity in Arkansas. But you might also recall that Jones was a late addition to a slate of candidates the U.S. senators sent to the White House for four federal judgeships. The original slate was all-white. One died, creating an opening for Jones on the list. But it soon became apparent that Sen. Blanche Lincoln had other favorites for the judgeships and pressure was applied for Jones to take a U.S. attorney slot in Fort Smith instead. He declined to be a racial poker chip and ran for prosecutor instead.

All's well that ends well. The judicial nomination process hurt Lincoln with black voters on Tuesday, however.

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