Dioxin down South | Arkansas Blog

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Dioxin down South

Posted By on Wed, Jan 25, 2012 at 3:42 PM

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Here's another feather in Koch Industries' cap: Its Georgia Pacific wood products and plastics plant at Crossett is the 19th worst emitter of dioxin in the country, according to a report released by Facing South today.

Naturally, the South bears the brunt of dioxin producing plants, so eager are we to take any industry we can get: Of the top 30 polluters, 25 are in the South, according to data in the study, which dates to 2010. The list is included in the report, titled "Dumping Dioxin on Dixie."

From the story:

Environmental dioxin pollution has been declining since the 1970s, but the EPA says current exposure levels "remain a concern." That's why the agency has undertaken a reassessment of the chemicals' effects on human health. The EPA has said it would release the non-cancer portion of the reassessment this month, with the cancer portion to follow "as expeditiously as possible." The reassessment has been delayed for decades amid political pressure from industry.

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