Tuesday, August 21, 2012

Huckabee: rape has created extraordinary people

Posted By on Tue, Aug 21, 2012 at 10:34 AM

Mike Huckabee image

Following his comment in a TV interview that Missouri victims of "forcible rape" rarely become pregnant, Rep. Todd Akin's apology tour yesterday detoured around a scheduled appearance on CNN's "Piers Morgan Tonight." Better to stick with friendly media. Like Mike Huckabee, who's never afraid to double-down on a political gaffe.

In a radio interview with Akin yesterday, the L.A. Times reports that Huckabee tried to help out the disgraced U.S. Senate candidate by pointing to several cases where rapes, "though horrible tragedies," had produced great human beings.

“Ethel Waters, for example, was the result of a forcible rape,” Huckabee said of the late American gospel singer. One-time presidential candidate Huckabee added: “I used to work for James Robison back in the 1970s, he leads a large Christian organization. He, himself, was the result of a forcible rape. And so I know it happens, and yet even from those horrible, horrible tragedies of rape, which are inexcusable and indefensible, life has come and sometimes, you know, those people are able to do extraordinary things.”

Akin, wisely, didn't respond directly to Huckabee's premise, according to the L.A. Times.

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