ASU touts strong enrollment | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, September 6, 2012

ASU touts strong enrollment

Posted By on Thu, Sep 6, 2012 at 5:57 AM

Thankfully, the news release doesn't credit Gus Malzahn.

But Arkansas State University is touting fall enrollment figures, steady overall, but with a big boost in both the number and entrance test scores of the freshman class of 1,676.

Read on:

JONESBORO, Sept. 5, 2012 — Preliminary, unofficial data at Arkansas State University shows that the university increased its fulltime equivalency (FTE) enrollment, held steady with overall headcount, and admitted its most academically talented freshman class in the institution’s history.

Fulltime equivalency enrollment, which is a measure of actual credit-hour production, increased by nearly 100 students. At the same time, the number of new freshmen jumped to 1,676, which is 7.3 percent more than last year. The number of undergraduate students transferring from other institutions is up by 7.2 percent.

The new freshman class also is better prepared academically than ever before, with an average ACT score of 23.
The enrollment numbers and quality of the entering class are some of the positive measures noted by university officials during an early analysis of enrollment trends.

The larger freshman class plus the boost in undergraduate transfers are testimony to Arkansas State’s appeal as a preferred destination for students. In fact, the increase is part of a five-year trend that shows 21.8 percent growth in transfers.

At 13,893, headcount enrollment was essentially unchanged from last fall’s record-setting 13,900. The number of undergraduate students is at an all-time high, at 10,205.
These and other numbers are based on a “snapshot” of enrollment statistics at the end of the 11th day of classes, the official census date for Arkansas public institutions of higher education.

“Given that ASU graduated or certificated almost 4,000 students and increased admission standards, these figures are heartening,” Chancellor Tim Hudson commented.

The growth in new freshman students was particularly noteworthy, he continued, especially in light of rising standards. “This year’s freshman class is better prepared academically than ever before, our most talented to date,” he added.

ASU’s higher admission standards resulted in more than 450 students not being able to achieve admission this year.
“This enrollment signifies unified efforts of several offices on campus — Recruitment, Financial Aid, Distance Education, International Office, Graduate School, Continuing Education, and Admissions, Records and Registration,” according to Dr. Rick Stripling, vice chancellor for Student Affairs. “In addition, faculty members have been superb in going above and beyond in recruiting for their various colleges. Students we graduated this past year show ASU is performing at high levels of recruiting and graduation. These are significant performance measures for a university.”
Enrollment of international students hit an all-time record of 856, an increase of 68, or 8.6 percent, above the comparable number of a year ago. This does not include international students who are in the English as a Second Language (ESL) program, which is non-credit instruction and not considered by the Arkansas Department of Higher Education for purposes of state funding.

The headcount in graduate-level programs declined slightly due to the record number of students at the doctoral, specialist’s or master’s levels earning graduate degrees last year.
The total headcount includes 1,703 students who are enrolled in other instructional sites that are associated with the Jonesboro campus. This includes 797 students who are enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs offered at ASU Degree Centers in Beebe, Blytheville, Forrest City, Mountain Home, Newport and West Memphis. Also, 498 students are attending ASU‑Paragould and 405 students are enrolled in college-level coursework provided by ASU at area high schools.

Following further analysis to ensure completeness of the data, ASU will its enrollment information to the Arkansas Department of Higher Education in October, in accordance with the reporting requirements for institutions of higher education.

Tags: ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Husbands' influence on the vote of women

    Hillary Clinton has been criticized for even mentioning that husbands might have had an influence on the vote of women, who only gave 54 percent of their vote to her candidacy. A social scientist says she might have a point.
    • Sep 25, 2017
  • Marking 60 years since the school crisis. Praise for the Nine and calls to action.

    The 60th anniversary of desegregation of Little Rock Central High School was lavishly recalled this morning with a ceremony featuring the eight surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, former President Bill Clinton, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Mayor Mark Stodola and many other speakers.
    • Sep 25, 2017
  • Security tightens at Little Rock airport

    Security procedures will tighten at Clinton National Airport this week as the Transportation Security Administration requires separate screening of all electronic devices larger than a cell phone.
    • Sep 25, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Auditor Lea caught not telling the truth

    State Auditor Andrea Lea, who began her tenure in statewide office with a degree of competence unseen in some other Republican counterparts (think Treasurer Dennis Milligan particularly), is becoming more deeply mired in a political scandal.
    • Mar 4, 2016
  • A response to police arrests becomes a tutorial on race, class and policing in Little Rock

    John Walker, the 79-year-old civil rights lawyer, and his associate, Omavi Shukur, 29, a young lawyer devoted to criminal justice reform, talked to press this afternoon about their arrests Monday by Little Rock police for supposedly obstructing governmental operations in observing and attempting to film a routine police traffic stop. It was a tutorial on sharp views of race, class and governance in Little Rock.
    • Sep 29, 2016
  • Another Republican miracle-working governor

    Great piece in Washington Post on the budget crisis in Louisiana. Big tax cuts and corporate welfare will do that to a state, particularly to a state whose previous governor, Republican Bobby Jindal, refused to join the Obamacare-funded Medicaid expansion. There's a lesson there for Arkansas.
    • Mar 4, 2016

Most Shared

  • Bad health care bill, again

    Wait! Postpone tax reform and everything else for a while longer because the Senate is going to try to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act one more time before September ends and while it can do it with the votes of only 50 senators.
  • Sex on campus

    Look, the Great Campus Rape Crisis was mainly hype all along. What Vice President Joe Biden described as an epidemic of sexual violence sweeping American college campuses in 2011 was vastly overstated.
  • The inadequate legacy of Brown

    LRSD continues to abdicate its responsibility to educate poor black students.

Most Viewed

  • Security tightens at Little Rock airport

    Security procedures will tighten at Clinton National Airport this week as the Transportation Security Administration requires separate screening of all electronic devices larger than a cell phone.
  • Conway coffee shop apologizes for white supremacist gathering

    A white supremacist gathering at a Conway coffee shop sparks a social media controversy and an abject apology.
  • Mike Beebe weighs in on preserving his private option plan

    Former Gov. Mike Beebe urges Arkansans to call senators to defeat the Graham-Calssidy health bill, which he says would be devastating to the Arkansas economy and the hundreds of thousands of people helped by the Medicaid expansion under Obamacare.
  • Central High at 60: Seize the day mayor. Stand up for LR schools.

    The conversion of a national debate on race is an apt commentary for the 60th anniversary of the Little Rock school crisis and the city's effort to sell it as an occasion to laud progress. Progress would be someone talking about the elephant in the room — the white establishment's takeover of the majority black Little Rock School District.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation