Juli's Law and the Supreme Court ruling | Arkansas Blog

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Juli's Law and the Supreme Court ruling

Posted By on Wed, Jun 5, 2013 at 3:33 PM

images.jpg


Re: Monday's Maryland v. King ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court.

Q. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that police may take DNA samples from persons arrested for serious crimes without having to get a court order, likening the DNA samples to fingerprints. May police personnel in Arkansas take DNA samples from persons arrested for serious crimes without a court order?

A. Arkansas is one of 28 states that collects DNA samples for use in a forensic identification database, according to Attorney General Dustin McDaniel. DNA is collected under the so-called “Juli’s Law,” enacted in 2009 and amended in 2011, which requires the police to take DNA samples at the time of detention from persons arrested for capital murder, murder in the first degree, kidnapping, rape or sexual assault in the first or second degree. The law was named for Juli Busken, a 21-year-old Benton native who was killed in 1996 and whose killer was apprehended as a result of a DNA match. The AG’s office joined every state AG in an amicus brief filed in support of the Supreme Court case decided Monday, Maryland v. King.

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who was among the minority in the 5-4 vote, gave a scathing dissent from the bench, saying he fears police will begin to take DNA swabs for all arrests. “Make no mistake about it: As an entirely predictable consequence of today’s decision,” he told the majority, “your DNA can be taken and entered into a national DNA database if you are ever arrested, rightly or wrongly, and for whatever reason.”

Bill Sadler, a spokesman for the State Police, said that agency is reviewing its policy, which now requires state troopers to get consent or a court order before taking a DNA sample, to see if it complies with state and federal law.
Asked about LRPD policy on DNA swabs, Sgt. Cassandra Davis emailed the Times that “No one from the department is prepared to speak on this issue at this time.”

Tags: , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (9)

Showing 1-9 of 9

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-9 of 9

Add a comment

More by Leslie Newell Peacock

  • Fountain Fest sculpture reveal tonight at the Arts Center

    You'll have to go to the Arkansas Arts Center's Fountain Fest tonight to see how Polk Stanley Wilcox Architects' winning sketch was carried out as the temporary sculpture in the Carrie Remmel Dickinson fountain. The party, with food, drink and music, gets going at 5:30 p.m.
    • Oct 19, 2017
  • Blue Canoe to open new brewing and gaming space

    Blue Canoe Brewing Co. is opening a 20,000-square-foot brewing and gaming space at 1637 E. 15th St., the old PC Hardware warehouse. Macie Fellows, who described herself as a “brand ambassador,” said the space, which Blue Canoe has remodeled “from the ground up,” will be Blue Canoe’s primary brewery.
    • Oct 11, 2017
  • Apartment project announced for SoMa

    The Lasiter Group announced today that it will build a 35-unit apartment complex in the 1300 block of Scott Street called the Villa View. The development, on the west side of Scott, will face the historic Villa Marre. The project should be complete by the end of 2018.
    • Oct 6, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Auditor Lea caught not telling the truth

    State Auditor Andrea Lea, who began her tenure in statewide office with a degree of competence unseen in some other Republican counterparts (think Treasurer Dennis Milligan particularly), is becoming more deeply mired in a political scandal.
    • Mar 4, 2016
  • Another Republican miracle-working governor

    Great piece in Washington Post on the budget crisis in Louisiana. Big tax cuts and corporate welfare will do that to a state, particularly to a state whose previous governor, Republican Bobby Jindal, refused to join the Obamacare-funded Medicaid expansion. There's a lesson there for Arkansas.
    • Mar 4, 2016
  • More on how highways were used to wipe out "blight" of non-white neighborhoods

    Vox, a news website that concerns itself with energy and other issues, has a fine piece, including before and after images, on the history of the U.S. interstate system and why roads were built through the middle of cities (unless people of influence stopped them — see Manhattan, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.)
    • Mar 22, 2016

Most Shared

  • Discussion: State killing of the mentally ill

    The Arkansas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and others will have a forum on mental illness and the death penalty at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Bowen School of Law's Friday Courtroom.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation