Religion and the Founding Fathers | Arkansas Blog

Friday, July 5, 2013

Religion and the Founding Fathers

Posted By on Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 9:28 AM

ffr.jpg

A day late, but still timeless is the ad that ran in several national newspapers yesterday courtesy of the Freedom from Religion Foundation. It was to provide a counterpoint to the advertising run by the conservative Christian-oriented Hobby Lobby people. (If you can't scale up your screen image, I've posted a somewhat larger version on the jump to make the quotes easier to read. Or you can click here.)

The Hobby Lobby ad has been getting a lot of approving comment from like-minded Arkansas Republicans. I was wondering this morning if it strikes them as at all ironic that they celebrate July 4 and America's revolt against state religion by talking warmly of their own efforts to make their religion the law in Arkansas? Bro. Rapert, for example, circulated a video that said the country would be OK if only President Obama would follow Jesus. He means the Rapert version of Jesus, of course. You know. The one who wanted women, gays and foreigners to be treated as second-class citizens, but just never got around to saying it in public.

Anyway. I thought I'd share the ad and explanation for those who aren't yet fully iimmersed in the First Church of Chick-fil-A and Hobby Lobby.

The ad is a direct response to a series of July 4 ads sponsored annually by Hobby Lobby since 2008, which shamelessly promote the myth that the United States was founded on God and Christianity. The large craft store chain’s ads of disinformation appear to run in hundreds of dailies. Although FFRF can’t compete with Hobby Lobby by running ads in virtually every daily, it is undertaking the single most expensive ad campaign in its history to counter the Religious Right message.

The ads quote U.S. Founders and Framers on their strong views against religion in government, and often critical views on religion in general. The ad features two revolutionaries and Deists, Thomas Paine and Benjamin Franklin, and the first four presidents: George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.

The ad documents that not only is the U.S. Constitution godless, but that there was no prayer during the Constitutional Convention, and that the Constitution’s primary architect, Madison, came to oppose government days of prayer, congressional chaplaincies and even “three pence” of tax dollars used in support of religion. The ad includes a website link that not only documents the quotations, but takes the reader to the original script in most cases!

ffr.jpg

Tags: , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (49)

Showing 1-49 of 49

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-49 of 49

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

  • Giuliani in the bullpen for Sessions?

    When Donald Trump starts tweeting about "beleaguered" Attorney General Jeff Sessions it adds credence to reports that Trump is looking to replace him with Rudy Giuliani.
    • Jul 24, 2017
  • Jared Kushner: Nothing to see here.

    Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son-in-law, has prepared a statement detailing four meetings with Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign and transition and he asserts nothing improper occurred. I'd rather talk about health care.
    • Jul 24, 2017
  • A night out: Beer and bullets

    A late night shooting in the Fayetteville entertainment district brings a reminder of the legislature's recent expansion of gun law.
    • Jul 24, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • Federal judge wants John Goodson to explain class action maneuvering

    A show-cause order filed Monday by federal Judge P.K. Holmes of Fort Smith indicates class action attorney John Goodson has some explaining to do about the move of a class action complaint against an insurance company from federal to state court with an instant pre-packaged settlement that has been criticized as a windfall for Goodson.
    • Dec 22, 2015
  • Satanic Temple: Make Rapert pay for Ten Commandments monument

    A petition drive has begun to encourage a demand that Sen. Jason Rapert pay for the legal fees in defending his Ten Commandments monument proposed for the state Capitol grounds. It's more work by the Satanic Temple, which has fought church-state entanglement around the country.
    • Aug 28, 2016
  • Jason Rapert vs. Wikipedia

    Sen. Jason Rapert against the world: Wikipedia edition.
    • Jan 23, 2016

Most Shared

  • Football for UA Little Rock

    Andrew Rogerson, the new chancellor at UA Little Rock, has decided to study the cost of starting a major college football team on campus (plus a marching band). Technically, it would be a revival of football, dropped more than 60 years ago when the school was a junior college.
  • Turn to baseball

    When the world threatens to get you down, there is always baseball — an absorbing refuge, an alternate reality entirely unto itself.

Most Viewed

  • A night out: Beer and bullets

    A late night shooting in the Fayetteville entertainment district brings a reminder of the legislature's recent expansion of gun law.
  • Giuliani in the bullpen for Sessions?

    When Donald Trump starts tweeting about "beleaguered" Attorney General Jeff Sessions it adds credence to reports that Trump is looking to replace him with Rudy Giuliani.
  • Jared Kushner: Nothing to see here.

    Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son-in-law, has prepared a statement detailing four meetings with Russians during the 2016 presidential campaign and transition and he asserts nothing improper occurred. I'd rather talk about health care.
  • Lies, sex and cell phones: The Arkansas roots of Hugh Freeze's demise

    I was going to leave the Hugh Freeze ouster at Ole Miss to the sportswriters but I thought it weird how the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette print account of his abrupt departure (from the AP) made no mention of Arkansas's own Houston Nutt, except as the coach Freeze succeeded.

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation