A question on Judicial Discipline appointment | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

A question on Judicial Discipline appointment

Posted By on Tue, Jul 30, 2013 at 12:25 PM

lamoureux.JPG

The Tweet this morning from Sen. Michael Lamoureux caught my attention because I didn't know the Senate president pro-tem got to appoint someone to the state Judicial Discipline and Disability Commission, which oversees judicial conduct.

Ted Thomas, by the way, is a former legislator. He is also employed as a political campaign consultant and judicial candidates need political consultants. But that's another matter.

The relevant part of state law says this about appointments to the Commission.

Three (3) members shall be lawyers admitted to practice in Arkansas who are not judges or former or retired judges, one (1) of whom shall be appointed by the Attorney General, one (1) by the President of the Senate, and one (1) by the Speaker of the House;

The Constitution makes the lieutenant governor president of the Senate. That's about the only job the office has, to preside over the Senate. A pro-tem is elected from membership to fill in. That's where Lamoureux comes in.

If Lamoureux really did appoint Ted Thomas, we have the makings of a TV sit-com. Because somebody appointed by Lt. Gov. Mark Darr already holds the seat for a lawyer named by the president of the Senate. That would be Thomas Fowler of Jonesboro, appointed by Darr to a six-year term in June 2012.

I've sent a question to Lamoureux about this. He's hitting the law books. Now.

UPDATE from Sen. Lamoureux:

On JDDC, I think you are right but asking staff to review, and find out why I have it in my packet of appointments.

UPDATE II: To my suspicion that there's more at work here politically than meets the eye, Lamoureux says no.

It isn't very interesting

Ann Cornwell [Senate chief of staff] makes me a sheet

I think when she saw president of sen., she mistakenly thought it was me

I called Ted today to see if he could accept

I am actually glad u caught it before it went any farther

Cornwell is junketing today, so I can't ask her further. I confess to some confusion about how something would pop up to alert Cornwell to an opening that won't exist for five years and which has always been filled by the "president of the Senate," a term of Constitutional law that I'd think she understood to mean the lieutenant governor after her long years at the Senate.

Tags: , , , , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Charter school accountability: Non-existent in Arkansas

    A state audit finds charter school spending violated state law, but the state Education Department says it has no responsibility for ensuring proper management of charter schools. Say what?
    • Mar 5, 2016
  • UPDATE: Hutchinson moves to cover himself on cut to War Memorial Stadium

    Gov. Asa Hutchinson apparently felt the burn from KARK's exclusive Tuesday night on his plans to cut state support of War Memorial Stadium in half beginning July 1, 2018. He has a so-far secret plan to make the stadium self-sustaining. We bet that doesn't include state support.
    • Oct 20, 2016
  • Policy group urges opposition to new charter seats in Little Rock

    The Arkansas Public Policy Panel is urging supporters of the Little Rock School District to tell state Board of Education members they oppose applications to be heard this week to dramatically expand the number of charter school seats in the Little Rock School District.
    • Mar 9, 2016

People who saved…

Most Shared

  • Take yourself there: Mavis Staples coming to LR for Central High performance

    Gospel and R&B singer and civil rights activist Mavis Staples, who has been inspiring fans with gospel-inflected freedom songs like "I'll Take You There" and "March Up Freedom's Highway" and the poignant "Oh What a Feeling" will come to Little Rock for the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the desegregation of Central High.
  • Klan's president

    Everything that Donald Trump does — make that everything that he says — is calculated to thrill his lustiest disciples. But he is discovering that what was brilliant for a politician is a miscalculation for a president, because it deepens the chasm between him and most Americans.
  • On Charlottesville

    Watching the Charlottesville spectacle from halfway across the country, I confess that my first instinct was to raillery. Vanilla ISIS, somebody called this mob of would-be Nazis. A parade of love-deprived nerds marching bravely out of their parents' basements carrying tiki torches from Home Depot.
  • Lynchings hidden in the history of the Hot Springs Confederate monument

    Hot Springs twice erupted into the kind of violence that has its roots in the issues left unresolved by the Civil War, and both times, it happened right where that monument to Confederate soldiers stands today.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation