Dustin McDaniel talks about Mayflower oil spill on NPR | Arkansas Blog

Monday, August 19, 2013

Dustin McDaniel talks about Mayflower oil spill on NPR

Posted By on Mon, Aug 19, 2013 at 11:50 AM

ON THE SPILL: Dustin McDaniel, in file photo, viewing Mayflower spill site.
  • ON THE SPILL: Dustin McDaniel, in file photo, viewing Mayflower spill site.
Attorney General Dustin McDaniel was among the panelists today on the Diane Rehm Show on National Public Radio for a discussion of oil spills in Michigan and Mayflower, Ark. (How'd McDaniel edge out Rep. Tim Griffin for limelight time? Griffin's too busy runnning stuff over to the daily newspaper, I guess. Too bad. It would have been a perfect time for Griffin to wear two hats: born-again consumer activist in Arkansas and tar sands conduit defender in Nebraska.)

At this link, you can click further to listen to the show. Michael Hibblen at KUAR, which airs the show, says McDaniel is on for about 10 minutes about 13 minutes into the show.

Comments on the show's website are interesting and extensive. Keystone XL, Congressman Griffin's BIG election issue in 2012, gets a lot of attention.

UPDATE: Though not a listed guest, Congressman Griffin got a little air time before the show was over. Big Oil's best friend is working overtime to improve his record with the home folks after his opening round apologia for Exxon.

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