Booksigning tomorrow: "The Public's Health" | Arkansas Blog

Friday, January 24, 2014

Booksigning tomorrow: "The Public's Health"

Posted By on Fri, Jan 24, 2014 at 2:57 PM

click to enlarge A pamphlet by Dr. Frances Sage Bradley, who headed the Arkansas Children's Bureau of the early 20th century.
  • A pamphlet by Dr. Frances Sage Bradley, who headed the Arkansas Children's Bureau of the early 20th century.


Dr. Sam Taggart
will be signing copies of his book "The Public's Health, A Narrative of Health and Disease in Arkansas," which was published by the Arkansas Times, at 3 p.m. Saturday at WordsWorth Books, 5920 R St., and from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. later that day at Dizzy's, 200 River Market Ave.
click to enlarge Mamie Hale, who taught African-American midwives proper procedures in child delivery.
  • Mamie Hale, who taught African-American midwives proper procedures in child delivery.

The book, on the genesis and current issues facing the state Health Department, marks the 100th anniversary of the department, but looks at Arkansas's health crises over the past 200 years, from malaria, yellow fever and smallpox in the early 19th century to today's issues with HIV/AIDS, obesity and smoking. (The Times reviewed the book in this week's issue.) The book tells the story of the many people, most unsung, who provided medical care to a poor, rural state, such as Dr. Frances Sage Bradley, who brought a traveling clinic to treat children to Arkansas in 1922 after swaying a "tight-fisted" legislature and headed up Arkansas Children's Bureau, and Mamie Hale, a Tuskegee-trained nurse midwife who trained black midwives between 1945 and 1950 to reduce infant mortality among the African-American community.

There are stories of the great flood, the polio epidemic, fights between private practice doctors and public policy and resistance to change — including the establishment of a health agency. It's a good read. 

 
click to enlarge Flood victims in Augusta; the great flood of 1923 left behind cases of malaria, typhoid and pellagra.
  • Flood victims in Augusta; the great flood of 1923 left behind cases of malaria, typhoid and pellagra.

Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments

Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-1 of 1

Add a comment

More by Leslie Newell Peacock

  • Windgate makes $300,000 grant to Pulaski Tech for arts

    A grant of $300,000 from the Windgate Charitable Foundation in Siloam Springs will promote UA Pulaski Tech's arts programming at its Center for Humanities and Arts (CHARTS), the college announced today.
    • Dec 12, 2017
  • Make like the Big Lebowski this holiday! Dust Bowl may open before Christmas

    The neon orange and green bowling pin signage is up, the bowling pin handles on the front door are attached and the Dust Bowl Lanes and Lounge at 315 E. Capitol Ave. should blow in by Christmas, an owner says.
    • Dec 11, 2017
  • More land for East Capitol View, Rose Creek trail

    Jason Baxter's seeming pie-in-the-sky sort of plan to develop East Capitol View may come closer to earth when the City Board at its reconvened meeting Dec. 12 considers as resolution to accept the donation of properties by Leland B. and Janet Jones "for the extension of the Rose Creek Trail" and to designate the land for a public park.
    • Dec 9, 2017
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • IHOP coming down, but .....

    I always scan the Little Rock City Board for items of interest this week and this one caught my eye: A zoning measure required by a proposal to tear down the IHOP at Markham and University.
    • Apr 30, 2016
  • Presidential thriller, co-author Bill Clinton, coming to bookstores in 2018

    June 2018 is the expected publication date for a novel collaboration by former President Bill Clinton and crime writer James Patterson.
    • May 9, 2017
  • LR speakers blast state board for double standard

    A series of speakers, beginning with Sen. Joyce Elliott, denounced what they saw as a hidden agenda favoring charter schools at the state Department of Education and asked the state Board of Education for return of local control.
    • May 12, 2016

Most Shared

  • Industrial hemp pilot program coming soon to Arkansas

    One of the booths at this week's Ark-La-Tex Medical Cannabis Expo was hosted by the Arkansas Hemp Association, a trade group founded to promote and expand non-intoxicating industrial hemp as an agricultural crop in the state. AHA Vice President Jeremy Fisher said the first licenses to grow experimental plots of hemp in the state should be issued by the Arkansas State Plant Board next spring.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation