Which side of the farm bill is Tom Cotton on? | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Which side of the farm bill is Tom Cotton on?

Posted By on Tue, Jan 28, 2014 at 7:01 AM

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Cue some Pete Seeger for Republican U.S. Rep. Tom Cotton, who faces a House vote tomorrow on what's been described as a bipartisan agreement on farm legislation. Which side is he on?

The agreement provides for cuts in food stamps, though not as much as Tom Cotton has insisted on to date, and changes in farm subsidies as well, but a general continuation of the supports important to many farmers in Arkansas.

Sen. Mark Pryor? He issued a statement:

I’m pleased to see that the conference committee has reached a bipartisan agreement. I hope my colleagues in the House will turn off the politics and help us get this bill over the finish line. Our agriculture sector—which contributes $17 billion to Arkansas’s economy alone—needs certainty to stay strong and thrive

Also looming for Different Drummer Tom Cotton: The New York Times reports growing support in the Republican Party for immigration legislation that would provide legal status for millions of people already in the U.S. without proper documentation. But conservative opposition is building, too. That would likely include extremist Cotton, the Latino workers in his current congressional district notwithstanding. Cotton is as unfriendly to immigrants as he is to hungry, poor, working citizens.


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