ASU med school tuition: $52,000 | Arkansas Blog

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

ASU med school tuition: $52,000

Posted By on Tue, Mar 18, 2014 at 1:27 PM

NEW USE: ASU is planning to use this existing building to start an osteopathic medical school. - ASU
  • ASU
  • NEW USE: ASU is planning to use this existing building to start an osteopathic medical school.

An article in Newsday reports
 on a New York institution's first out-of-state expansion, to open an osteopathic medical school at Arkansas State University at Jonesboro.

Noted: The article says the New York Institute of Technology sees the Arkansas expansion as a way to increase its stature.

Tuititon would be $52,000, the same as at an existing campus in New York. That compares with $23,000 at the UAMS College of Medicine.

The article notes that there are 800 residency slots in Arkansas to further train new medical college graduates. The article doesn't make wholly clear that those are UAMS residencies. The article does quote UAMS Chancellor Dan Rahn, who's skeptical about the ability to provide residency slots for graduates in an an already-tight academic market. Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee of NYIT says:

"We are planning to establish new residency training programs in hospitals that are not currently involved in residency training," Ross-Lee said. In 2013, NYIT matched 99 percent of its medical graduates with residency programs, college officials said.

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