Pulaski County disqualified 10 percent of absentee ballots | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Pulaski County disqualified 10 percent of absentee ballots

Posted By on Thu, May 22, 2014 at 1:48 PM

The Pulaski County Election Commission met today and it appears 62 of 636, or just about 10 per cent of mail absentee ballots cast in the county were disqualified for lack of a proper ID. That's better than the 80 percent in St. Francis County, but still a big number.

Of more than 40,000 in-person voters, 25 filled out provisional ballots for failure to have proper ID at the poll. As of Thursday, two of those had produced an ID so their vote could count.

There is no count — if it exists — of people who told the ACLU that they tried but were unable to get the legally required provisional ballot when found to have insufficient ID.

More to come on the discussion of misapplication of the Voter ID law in which election workers were quizzing voters on birthdates and addresses on the photo IDs, which are supposed to be used only for photo purposes. A separate part of the process covers birthday and address.

The Pulaski County Election Commission filed the lawsuit that led to invalidation of a state Board of Election Commissioners rule aimed at trying to fix a big flaw in the state law — no way for an absentee voter to cure the failure to provide an ID before votes are certified. In-person voters have that opportunity. That case also led to a ruling striking down the whole law, but the Arkansas Supreme Court said that issue hadn't been fully litigated. Circuit Judge Tim Fox issued a similar ruling in a separate lawsuit by the ACLU and the Arkansas Public Law Center (on whose board I set), but the Supreme Court stayed that ruling and the ID law took effect.

The Pulaski Commission will notify disqualified absentee voters that their vote didn't count and why.

Election Commissioner Chris Burks tells me the Commission voted to "revamp training and revise poll worker personnel policies this summer." This will allow the chief judge to quickly correct problems that develop, such as the improper interpretation of the ID law.

Tags: , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (8)

Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-8 of 8

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • More on how highways were used to wipe out "blight" of non-white neighborhoods

    Vox, a news website that concerns itself with energy and other issues, has a fine piece, including before and after images, on the history of the U.S. interstate system and why roads were built through the middle of cities (unless people of influence stopped them — see Manhattan, San Francisco and Washington, D.C.)
    • Mar 22, 2016
  • City Board votes to table homeless feeding ordinance for 8 weeks, study with commission

    The Little Rock Board of Directors voted tonight to table for eight weeks an ordinance that homeless advocates say would severely limit the ability of charities to feed homeless people in city parks. Before the ordinance was punted, Vice Mayor Kathy Webb proposed a nine-member commission to study the issue and make recommendations to the board.
    • May 16, 2017
  • LR speakers blast state board for double standard

    A series of speakers, beginning with Sen. Joyce Elliott, denounced what they saw as a hidden agenda favoring charter schools at the state Department of Education and asked the state Board of Education for return of local control.
    • May 12, 2016

Most Shared

  • Guest Playlist: Flap Jones of "Not Necessarily Nashville" schools us on real country music

    "Not Necessarily Nashville," which airs on KUAR-FM 89.1 every Saturday, 7 p.m.-9 p.m., celebrates three decades of the "best of the rest of country music" Saturday, October 21 at the White Water Tavern with Brad Williams of The Salty Dogs & The Creek Rocks, and we asked host Flap Jones to curate a playlist for us ahead of that anniversary celebration.
  • Discussion: State killing of the mentally ill

    The Arkansas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and others will have a forum on mental illness and the death penalty at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Bowen School of Law's Friday Courtroom.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation