The Walton dream realized in New Orleans: All charter schools. Or is it a nightmare? | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, May 29, 2014

The Walton dream realized in New Orleans: All charter schools. Or is it a nightmare?

Posted By on Thu, May 29, 2014 at 2:12 PM

click to enlarge UNEQUAL ACCESS: The computerized lottery system for charter school participation isn't joined by the city's best schools. In two to 10 years, maybe, they'll join OneAPP, promoted in this photo from the Walton Family Foundation.
  • UNEQUAL ACCESS: The computerized lottery system for charter school participation isn't joined by the city's best schools. In two to 10 years, maybe, they'll join OneAPP, promoted in this photo from the Walton Family Foundation.
I highly recommend this big Washington Post article on the end of conventional public schools in New Orleans. Thanks to Katrina, recovery money and Louisiana politics, the schools have been turned over to charter school operators.

The story is about winners and losers. On the surface, the overall numbers look better on student test scores. But the Katrina diaspora of poor families from New Orleans makes it impossible to neatly compare overall scores today with pre-Katrina. Black school employees were fired wholesale. Many have been replaced by young, white Teach for America recruits.

But then this passage is stunning in its honesty:

White students disproportionately attend the best charter schools, while the worst are almost exclusively populated by African American students. Activists in New Orleans joined with others in Detroit and Newark last month to file a federal civil rights complaint, alleging that the city’s best-performing schools have admissions policies that exclude African American children. Those schools are overseen by the separate Orleans Parish School Board, and they don’t participate in OneApp, the city’s centralized school enrollment lottery.

John White, the state’s superintendent of education, agreed that access to the best schools is not equal in New Orleans, but he said the state is prevented by law from interfering with the Orleans Parish School Board’s operations.

“The claim that there’s an imbalance is right on the money,” White said. “The idea that it’s associated with privilege and high outcomes is right on the money.”

Stan Smith, acting superintendent of the Orleans Parish schools, said his district’s charter schools have agreed to participate in the OneApp when their contracts are renewed, in two to 10 years from now.

So black children might have equal access to the best schools in 10 years? In 1954, it would have been unthinkable that the U.S. Supreme Court would countenance such as this. But it is 2014. And we have no less than Chief Justice John Roberts telling us that it is a post-racial world and no correctives are necessary any longer.

The Walton Family Foundation is a big player in New Orleans, of course.

Tags: , , ,

From the ArkTimes store

Favorite

Comments (5)

Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-5 of 5

Add a comment

More by Max Brantley

Readers also liked…

  • Auditor Lea caught not telling the truth

    State Auditor Andrea Lea, who began her tenure in statewide office with a degree of competence unseen in some other Republican counterparts (think Treasurer Dennis Milligan particularly), is becoming more deeply mired in a political scandal.
    • Mar 4, 2016
  • El Dorado challenges state Board transfer decision; raises broad question about 'choice' vs. segregation

    The El Dorado School District HAS gone to federal court in response to the state Board of Education's approval, over El Dorado's objection, of the transfer of a white student from El Dorado to the majority white Parkers Chapel School District.
    • Aug 18, 2016
  • Another Republican miracle-working governor

    Great piece in Washington Post on the budget crisis in Louisiana. Big tax cuts and corporate welfare will do that to a state, particularly to a state whose previous governor, Republican Bobby Jindal, refused to join the Obamacare-funded Medicaid expansion. There's a lesson there for Arkansas.
    • Mar 4, 2016

Most Shared

  • Take yourself there: Mavis Staples coming to LR for Central High performance

    Gospel and R&B singer and civil rights activist Mavis Staples, who has been inspiring fans with gospel-inflected freedom songs like "I'll Take You There" and "March Up Freedom's Highway" and the poignant "Oh What a Feeling" will come to Little Rock for the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the desegregation of Central High.
  • Klan's president

    Everything that Donald Trump does — make that everything that he says — is calculated to thrill his lustiest disciples. But he is discovering that what was brilliant for a politician is a miscalculation for a president, because it deepens the chasm between him and most Americans.
  • On Charlottesville

    Watching the Charlottesville spectacle from halfway across the country, I confess that my first instinct was to raillery. Vanilla ISIS, somebody called this mob of would-be Nazis. A parade of love-deprived nerds marching bravely out of their parents' basements carrying tiki torches from Home Depot.

Most Viewed

Most Recent Comments

Blogroll

 

© 2017 Arkansas Times | 201 East Markham, Suite 200, Little Rock, AR 72201
Powered by Foundation