Fayetteville studying non-discrimination ordinance that protects gay people | Arkansas Blog

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Fayetteville studying non-discrimination ordinance that protects gay people

Posted By on Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 6:43 AM

MATTHEW PETTY: Sponsors non-discrimination ordinance,
  • MATTHEW PETTY: Sponsors non-discrimination ordinance,
Eureka Springs has led the way. Cities in Mississippi are even on the honor roll. Baton Rouge may get there. Now Fayetteville will consider an ordinance to prohibit discrimination in public services, housing and employment that adds sexual orientation and family status to the familiar list of categories generally protected by federal law.

Council member Matthew Petty introduced the ordinance for a first reading at a meeting Tuesday night. No other Council members commented. It will be discussed again at August meetings.

The Fayetteville Council passed a similar measure in 1998, but it was vetoed by then-Mayor Fred Hannah. It was put on the ballot by petition, but defeated. A lot has changed since 1998 on attitudes towards people of different sexual orientation, not to mention Fayetteville leadership. Current Mayor Lioneld Jordan was quoted in a local press account as saying he was "pretty sure the city's head count would increase as a result of the proposal."

Here's some background.

Is there a Matthew Petty on the Little Rock Board of Directors?





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