Rogers City Attorney Ben Lipscomb won't be charged for flashing badge at Miranda Lambert concert | Arkansas Blog

Friday, September 5, 2014

Rogers City Attorney Ben Lipscomb won't be charged for flashing badge at Miranda Lambert concert

Posted By on Fri, Sep 5, 2014 at 7:37 PM

NO CRIME: Rogers City Attorney Ben Lipscomb may have showed bad judgment -- again -- but it wasn't a crime a special prosecutor has concluded.
  • NO CRIME: Rogers City Attorney Ben Lipscomb may have showed bad judgment -- again -- but it wasn't a crime a special prosecutor has concluded.
KNWA reports that a special prosecutor has concluded no charges should be filed against Rogers City Attorney Ben Lipscomb for flashing a badge to get VIP treatment at a Miranda Lambert concert at the Walmart AMP.

In a letter to Benton County Circuit Judge Brad Karren, the prosecutor appointed to the case said he believes the allegations against Ben Lipscomb were the result of a misunderstanding or miscommunication. Prosecutor Marc McCune goes on to say that the badge and ID Lipscomb showed a concert employee "clearly identify him as a Prosecuting Attorney and City Attorney, and not as a police officer."

McCune also said even if Lipscomb did pretend to be an undercover officer, for it to be a criminal impersonation he would have had to "act purposely to injure, defraud, harass or intimidate the employee."

So Lipscomb committed no crime even if he did use his position to get favorable treatment. Just bad judgment. And not for the first time.

He's still the man who cost the city $630,000 for bad advice on firing a city attorney.

He's still the man who reportedly shared a prescription drug, Xanax, with another city employee.

He's still the man accused of harassing communications; the man who claimed a homestead property tax exemption for a house outside Rogers though the city attorney is required to live in Rogers.

He's still the man who was a bullying sycophant for bullying then-Mayor Steve Womack when a college station raised a concern about immigrants fearful of reporting abuse to the police because of Womack's no-mercy policy toward immigrants.

In short, being Ben Lipscomb means never having to say you're sorry.

UPDATE:  But wait. A statement from Mayor Greg Hines suggests someone isn't fully cowed by Lipscomb's specialness. His statement reported on KFSM:
 
I did what I thought was appropriate and tuned it over to the Prosecuting Attorneys Office. I respect the Special Prosecutors decision. In my judgement, the potential misdemeanor charge was hardly the most egregious part of this incident. The greater concern is an elected official thinking it’s okay to use his position to gain access to a restricted area for the sole purpose of obtaining a cocktail. If getting a drink is so important, buy the VIP tickets. As a former law enforcement officer, it's troubling to think your local city prosecutor would act in this manner. Mr. Lipscomb’s actions were inappropriate and served up more than a cocktail, they served up public scrutiny, distrust, and embarrassment to Rogers and area elected officials.

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